Shared Grammaticalization

With special focus on the Transeurasian languages

Editors
| Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz
| University of Leuven
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205995 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027272140 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book offers fresh perspectives on “shared grammaticalization”, a state whereby two or more languages have the source and the target of a grammaticalization process in common. While contact-induced grammaticalization has generated great interest in recent years, far less attention has been paid to other factors that may give rise to shared grammaticalization. This book intends to put this situation right by approaching shared grammaticalization from an integrated perspective, including areal as well as genealogical and universal motivations and by searching for ways to distinguish between these factors. The volume offers a wealth of empirical facts, presented by internationally renowned specialists, on the Transeurasian languages (i.e. Japonic, Koreanic, Tungusic, Mongolic, and Turkic) — the languages in focus —as well as on various other languages. Shared Grammaticalization will appeal to scholars and advanced students concerned with linguistic reconstruction, language contact and linguistic typology, and to anyone interested in grammaticalization theory.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 132]  2013.  xv, 360 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of tables
ix–x
List of figures
xi–xii
List of contributors
xiii–xiv
Acknowledgements
xv–xvi
Chapter 1. Towards a typology of shared grammaticalization
Martine Robbeets and Hubert Cuyckens
1–20
Part I. Shared grammaticalization: Typological and theoretical aspects
Chapter 2. Areal diffusion and parallelism in drift: Shared grammaticalization patterns
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
23–42
Chapter 3. Demystifying drift: A variationist account
Brian D. Joseph
43–66
Chapter 4. Contact-induced replication: Some diagnostics
Bernd Heine and Motoki Nomachi
67–100
Chapter 5. Isomorphic processes: Grammaticalization and copying of grammatical elements
Lars Johanson
101–110
Part II. Shared grammaticalization in the Transeurasian languages
Chapter 6. Scalar additive operators in Transeurasian languages: A comparison with Europe
Volker Gast and Johan van der Auwera
113–146
Chapter 7. Genealogically motivated grammaticalization
Martine Robbeets
147–176
Chapter 8. Verbalization and insubordination in Siberian languages
Andrej L. Malchukov
177–208
Part III. Shared grammaticalization in the Altaic languages
Chapter 9. Personal pronouns in Core Altaic
Juha A. Janhunen
211–226
Chapter 10. Postposed indefinite articles in Mongolic and Turkic languages of the Qinghai-Gansu Sprachbund
Hans Nugteren
227–250
Chapter 11. Growing apart in shared grammaticalization
Éva Ágnes Csató
251–258
Chapter 12. Incipient grammaticalization of a redundant purpose clause marker in Lamunxin Ėven: Contact-induced change or independent innovation?
Brigitte Pakendorf
259–284
Part IV. Shared grammaticalization in Japanese and Korean
Chapter 13. Grammaticalization of space in Korean and Japanese
Heiko Narrog and Seongha Rhee
287–316
Chapter 14. Grammaticalization of allocutivity markers in Japanese and Korean in a crosslinguistic perspective
Anton Antonov
317–340
Chapter 15. A possible grammaticalization in Old Japanese and its implications for the comparison 
of Korean and Japanese
J. Marshall Unger
341–354
Language index
355–358
Subject index
359–360
“The volume stands out because of the vast amount of empirical data gathered and presented, not only from the Transeurasian languages, but from European and Amazonian languages as well. Additionally, many different linguistic areas are represented within the volume: morphology (articles, verbs, personal pronouns, allocutivity markers), lexicology (suffixes and prefixes), semantics (scalar additive operators), phonology (fricatives, voicing) and syntax (insubordination). [...]
The methodology and theoretical aspects brought into light are of great value for those researchers who wish to start or continue their own research in the field of grammaticalization, regardless of the languages or linguistic categories in question.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Kuteva, Tania, Bernd Heine, Bo Hong, Haiping Long, Heiko Narrog & Seongha Rhee
2019.  In World Lexicon of Grammaticalization, Crossref logo

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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2012050566