Hua

A Papuan Language of the Eastern Highlands of New Guinea

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ISBN 9789027230041 | EUR 135.00 | USD 203.00
 
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ISBN 9789027283191 | EUR 135.00 | USD 203.00
 
There is no country in the world where as many different languages are spoken as in New Guinea, approximately a fifth of the languages in the world. Most of these so-called Papuan languages seem to be unrelated to languages spoken elsewhere. The present work is the first truly comprehensive study of such a language, Hua. The chief typological peculiarity of Hua is the existence of a ‘medial verb’construction used to conjoin clauses in compound and complex sentences. Hua also shows a fundamental morphological distinction between coordinate and subordinate medial clauses, the latter are not ‘tense-iconic’, the events they describe are not necessarily prior to the event described in later clauses. Moreover their truth is always presupposed. The distribution and behaviour of a post-nominal suffix - mo provides insights into the nature of topics, conditional clauses, and functional definitions of the parts of speech. In phonology, the central rules of assimilation are constrained by the universal hierarchy of sonority, which may, however, be derived from binary features. These are some of the areas in which the grammar of Hua is unusually perspicuous. The present work aims at a standard of completeness such that it would be a useful reference work for research in almost any theoretical topic.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 5]  1980.  iv, 550 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
HUA, a Papuan Language of the Eastern Highlands of New Guinea
vii
Acnowledgements
ix
Introduction
xxix
Part I: Phonology
1–112
0 The phoneme inventory
3
1 Rules which create unmarked syllables
5
1.1 Rules of coalescence
5
1.2 The rule shwa insertion
23
1.3 The interaction of coalescence and shwa insertion
28
2 Other contact rules
33
2.1 Prenasalization and preglottalization
33
2.2 Minor rules
40
2.3 Conclusion
44
2.4 Summary of rules in sections 1 and 2
44
3 Conjugation
47
3.1 Verb stem alternations
47
3.2 Morphophonemics of the desinences
60
3.3 Summary: the rules and their ordering
76
3.4 A note on transcription
79
4 Suprasegmentals
81
4.1 The boundaries
81
4.2 The sequential constraints
82
4.3 Stress
92
4.4 Tone
108
5 Summary and conclusions: the distinctive features in Hua
111
5.1 Vowels
111
5.2 Consonants
111
Part II: Morphology
113–329
6 The parts of speech: some morphological definitions
115
7 Verb complexes
117
7.1 Main verbs as compounds: the support verb hu-
117
7.2 The auxiliary and desinential suffixes
135
7.3 Verbal prefixes
193
8 Noun complexes
215
8.1 The internal structure of the stem
215
8.2 Nominal suffixes
220
8.3 Prefixes on the noun complex
254
9 Prenominal qualifiers
257
9.1 Deictics
257
9.2 Quantifiers
260
9.3 Modifiers
262
10 Miscellaneous parts of speech
271
10.1 Postpositions
271
10.2 Conjunctions
271
10.3 Interjections
272
11 Interrogative words
275
11.1 Interrogative verbs
275
11.2 Interrogative nouns
276
12 Syntactic definitions of the parts of speech
279
13 Derivational morphology
291
13.1 Verbal suffixes
291
13.2 Noun-forming suffixes
292
13.3 Bivalent nomino-adjectival suffixes
293
13.4 Nominalized relative clauses
299
Part III: Syntax
331–470
A further note on transcription
333
14 Introduction: word order and constituency
335
14.1 The existence of a predicate node
336
14.2 The position of desinences in a tree representation
338
15 Transitivity
343
15.1 Copula and existential verbs
343
15.2 Reflexives
349
15.3 Benefactive constructions
352
15.4 The syntactic structure of to- support
355
15.5 Impersonal transitive verbs
357
15.6 Ergative and nominative
360
16 Agreement phenomena
365
16.1 The expression of possession
366
16.2 Verb-object agreement
371
16.3 Subject-verb agreement
374
17 Asymmetrical coordination: medial clauses
391
17.1 Coordinate medials
392
17.2 The semantics of conditional clauses
411
17.3 Subordinate medials
419
17.4 A diagnostic for tense
428
18 Symmetrical coordination
431
19 Modality
441
19.1 Desire
441
19.2 Dislike, distaste, and fear
444
19.3 Ability
445
19.4 Permission
446
19.5 Obligation and uncertainty
446
19.6 Modal opacity and modal neutrality
447
20 Discourse
459
20.1 A diagnostic for paragraphs
459
20.2 Topics
467
Part IV: Texts
471–512
21 Hua oral literature
473
21.1 Origin of the Siane
473
21.2 The man who fucked knotholes
479
21.3 How penes got short
483
21.4 The wild woman and the domesticated woman
488
Appendix: the linguistic landscape
513–546
22 Hua in its multilingual context
515
22.1 Comparative notes on Zavina (Gimi)
516
22.2 Comparative notes on Kma (Siane)
531
References
547
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  81135637