Experimental Linguistics

Integration of theories and applications

Editors
| University of Alberta
| University of Alberta
| University of Alberta
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789064391644 | EUR 80.00 | USD 120.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270863 | EUR 80.00 | USD 120.00
 
Linguistics has suffered from the lack of interaction between theoretical and experimental activities. In order to carry out experimental studies in language it is, of course, necessary to have a descriptive system for the stimuli, and formal linguistics has provided a plethora of alternative possibilities. In addition, the theory can perhaps suggest some hints as to the direction experimental studies might take, at least to the extent that it suggest various kinds of relation among syntactic or phonological structures. But the theory alone cannot determine the nature of such relations in the cognitive or processing system of the language user. The first section of this volume addresses several of the key theoretical controversies in linguistics and attempts to specify the kinds of experimental evidence which might contribute to their ultimate resolution. The papers in the second section concern the collection of that evidence and its interpretation.
[Studies in the Sciences of Language Series, 3]  1980.  vi, 321 pp.
Publishing status: Available | Original publisher: E. Story-Scientia
Table of Contents
Introduction: Experimental linguistics in historical perspective.
B.L. Derwig, Gary D. Prideaux and Will Baker
1–13
PART I: THEORETICAL BASES FOR EXPERIMENTAL LINGUISTICS (editorial introduction)
15–20
1. On paraphrase.
Paul Fletcher
21–34
2. What is structural ambiguity?
P.G. Patel
21–34
3. On theories of focus.
Christine M. Andrew
55–63
4. Preliminaries to the experimental investigation of style in language.
Mary Lois Marckworth
65–80
5. English pluralization: A testing ground for rule evaluation.
B.L. Derwig
81–112
PART II: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS (editorial introduction)
113–119
1. Grammatical properties of sentences as a basis for concept formation.
Will Baker, Gary D. Prideaux and B.L. Derwig
121–140
2. Grammatical voice and illocutionary meaning in an aural concept formation task.
J. Raymond Reid
141–155
3. Grammatical simplicity or performative efficiency?
Will Baker and Gary D. Prideaux
157–173
4. A performative definition of sentence relatedness.
Gary D. Prideaux and Will Baker
175–183
5. Paraphrase relationships among clefted sentences.
Paul Fletcher
185–201
6. The recognition of ambiguity.
Gary D. Prideaux and Will Baker
203–213
7. An experimental investigation of focus.
Christine M. Andrew
215–230
8. A discriminant function analysis of co-variation of a number of syntactic devices in five prose genres.
Mary Lois Marckworth and Will Baker
231–246
9. Rule learning and the English inflections (with special emphasis on the plural).
B.L. Derwig and Will Baker
247–272
10. Perceptual dimensions of phonemic recognition.
John C.L. Ingram
273–291
Epilogue: An "information structure" view of language.
Will Baker
293–307
Bibliography
309–321
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Kunsmann, Peter, Johannes Gordesch & Burkhard Dretzke
1998. Native speakers’ reactions to modern English usage. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics 5:3  pp. 214 ff. Crossref logo
O'Neill, Paul
2014.  In Portuguese-Spanish Interfaces [Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, 1],  pp. 175 ff. Crossref logo
Ohala, John J.
1986. Consumer's guide to evidence in phonology. Phonology Yearbook 3  pp. 3 ff. Crossref logo
Ohala, John J.
1993. Coarticulation and Phonology. Language and Speech 36:2-3  pp. 155 ff. Crossref logo
Piquette, Elyse
1976. The translator’s sensitivity to syntactic ambiguity—a psycholinguistics experiment. Canadian Journal of Linguistics/Revue canadienne de linguistique 21:1  pp. 95 ff. Crossref logo
Sankoff, David
2006.  In Encyclopedia of Statistical Sciences, Crossref logo
Sankoff, David
2014.  In Wiley StatsRef: Statistics Reference Online, Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 30 december 2019. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFD – Psycholinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  81103930