Article published in:
Communication in Autism
Edited by Joanne Arciuli and Jon Brock
[Trends in Language Acquisition Research 11] 2014
► pp. 103122
References

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Cited by 1 other publications

Lochrin, Margaret, Joanne Arciuli & Mridula Sharma
2015. Assessing the Relationship Between Prosody and Reading Outcomes in Children Using the PEPS-C. Scientific Studies of Reading 19:1  pp. 72 ff. Crossref logo

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