Ergativity in Amazonia

Editors
| University of Oregon
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206701 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027288509 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
This volume presents a typological/theoretical introduction plus eight papers about ergative alignment in 16 Amazonian languages. All are written by linguists with years of fieldwork and comparative experience in the region, all describe details of the synchronic systems, and several also provide diachronic insight into the evolution of these systems. The five papers in Part I focus on languages from four larger families with ergative patterns primarily in morphology. The typological contribution is in detailed consideration of unusual splits, changes in ergative patterns, and parallels between ergative main clauses and nominalizations. The three papers in Part II discuss genetically isolated languages. Two present dominant ergative patterns in both morphology and syntax, the other a syntactic inverse system that is predominantly ergative in discourse. In each, the authors demonstrate that identification of traditional grammatical relations is problematic. These data will figure in all future typological and theoretical debates about grammatical relations.
[Typological Studies in Language, 89]  2010.  v, 319 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Manifestations of ergativity in Amazonia
Francesc Queixalós and Spike Gildea
1–26
Part I. Well-established systems
Ergativity in the Mayoruna branch of the Panoan family
David W. Fleck
29–64
Ergativity in Shipibo-Konibo, a Panoan language of the Ucayali
Pilar M. Valenzuela
65–96
How ergative is Cavineña?
Antoine Guillaume
97–120
The ergativity effect in Kuikuro (Southern Carib, Brazil)
Bruna Franchetto
121–158
Nominative-absolutive: Counter-universal split ergativity in Jê and Cariban
Spike Gildea and Flávia Castro Alves
159–200
Part II. Recent diachronic innovations
Ergativity in Trumai
Raquel Guirardello-Damian
203–234
Grammatical relations in Katukina-Kanamari
Francesc Queixalós
235–284
The intransitive basis of Movima clause structure
Katharina Haude
285–316
Index
317–320
“This fine collection of papers demonstrates the importance of examining first-hand discourse data to shape current linguistic theory, as each author -- after meticulously describing and discussing ergative patterns in a particular language or language family -- questions or further defines established linguistic categories.
It is great to see more work come out of this highly underdescribed and understudied geographic region and to have collaboration of researchers across the globe. This volume is surely an important addition to typology potentially inspiring further first-hand data-driven typological studies that challenge and refine current definitions of ergativity and of linguistic categories. Furthermore, I welcome the growing interdependent relationship between fieldwork and typology, as evident from this volume, where new data from previously undescribed languages and already existing data equally inform linguistic theory.”
“This volume is an important addition to the literature on ergativity in the world's languages, providing as it does detailed information on ergativity (both morphological and syntactic) in sixteen Amazonian languages. One appreciates the level of fine descriptive detail given in the articles; this represents the primary contribution of the book.”
“This volume is an important addition to the literature on ergativity in the world's languages, providing as it does detailed information on ergativity (both morphological and syntactic) in sixteen Amazonian languages. One appreciates the level of fine descriptive detail given in the articles; this represents the primary contributions of this book.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Storto, Luciana
2014. Review of Aikhenvald (2012): The languages of the Amazon. Studies in Language 38:2  pp. 427 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2009046917 | Marc record