A History of the English Language

Revised edition

| Arizona State University
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ISBN 9789027212085 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
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ISBN 9789027212092 | EUR 33.00 | USD 49.95
 
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The English language in its complex shapes and forms changes fast. This thoroughly revised edition has been refreshed with current examples of change and has been updated regarding archeological research. Most suggestions brought up by users and reviewers have been incorporated, for instance, a family tree for Germanic has been added, Celtic influence is highlighted much more, there is more on the origin of Chancery English, and internal and external change are discussed in much greater detail. The philosophy of the revised book remains the same with an emphasis on the linguistic history and on using authentic texts. My audience remains undergraduates (and beginning graduates). The goals of the class and the book are to come to recognize English from various time periods, to be able to read each stage with a glossary, to get an understanding of typical language change, internal and external, and to understand something about language typology through the emphasis on the change from synthetic to analytic.

This book has a companion website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/z.183.website

This title replaces A History of the English Language (2006)

[Not in series, 183]  2014.  xx, 338 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface to the first edition (2006)
ix–xi
Preface to the revised edition
xii–xiii
Notes to the user and abbreviations
xiv–xv
List of tables
xvi–xviii
List of figures
xix–xx
1. The English language
1–14
2. English spelling, sounds, and grammar
15–32
3. Before Old English
33–50
4. Old English: 450–1150
51–94
5. From Old to Middle English
95–114
6. Middle English: 1150–1500
115–158
7. Early Modern English: 1500–1700
159–206
8. Modern English: 1700–the present
207–250
9. English around the world
251–282
10. Conclusion
283–294
Appendix I: Possible answers to the exercises and some additional information on in-text questions
295–310
Appendix II: How to use the OED
311–314
Appendix III: Chronology of historical events
315–320
References
321–334
Index
335–338
“This book is incredibly well-written and readable. It is full of history but never gets boring. The exercises are stimulating and there are tons of great texts.”
“Great research, many options for additional information for research as you read. Diagrams, tables, and figures which add to the learning process. Lots of activities to strengthen what was just explained. Appendices very useful -- this book is not dry as so many others are - plainly written and easy to understand but extensively informative.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
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Collins, Tim
2018.  In The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Hancil, Sylvie
2013.  In Histoire de la langue anglaise,  pp. 177 ff. Crossref logo
Heuer, Katharina, Lena C. Müller-Frommeyer & Simone Kauffeld
2020. Language Matters: The Double-Edged Role of Linguistic Style Matching in Work Groups. Small Group Research 51:2  pp. 208 ff. Crossref logo
Jucker, Andreas
2020.  In Politeness in the History of English, Crossref logo
Müller‐Frommeyer, Lena C., Simone Kauffeld & Alexandra Paxton
2020. Beyond Consistency: Contextual Dependency of Language Style in Monolog and Conversation. Cognitive Science 44:4 Crossref logo
Sebo, Erin
2017. Does OE Puca Have an Irish Origin?. Studia Neophilologica 89:2  pp. 167 ff. Crossref logo
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2015. From dialect to standard: English in England 1154–1776. <i>WORD</i> 61:4  pp. 352 ff. Crossref logo
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2AB – Linguistics/English
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014000308