Pedagogical Grammar

| Boise State University
| Georgia State University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027212177 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027212184 | EUR 33.00 | USD 49.95
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269317 | EUR 95.00/33.00*
| USD 143.00/49.95*
 
This book provides a comprehensive overview of pedagogical grammar research and explores its implications for the teaching of grammar in second language classrooms. Drawing on several research domains (e.g., corpus linguistics, task-based language teaching) and a number of theoretical orientations (e.g., cognitive, sociocultural), the book proposes a framework for pedagogical grammar which brings together three major areas of inquiry: (1) descriptions of grammar in use, (2) descriptions of grammar acquisition processes, and (3) investigations of the relative effectiveness of different approaches to L2 grammar instruction. The book balances research and theory with practical discussions of the decisions that teachers must make on a daily basis, offering guidance in such areas as materials development, data-driven learning, task design, and classroom assessment.
[Not in series, 190]  2014.  ix, 245 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix
Pedagogical grammar: A framework for language teachers
1–6
Pedagogical grammar in applied linguistics: A historical overview
7–31
What is grammar and how can it be described?
33–50
The lexis-grammar interface: Phraseology, collocation, and formulaic sequences
51–66
Evaluating and adapting existing materials
67–86
Investigating grammar use through online corpora
87–120
The dynamic nature of L2 learner language
121–144
Instructed L2 grammar acquisition: Six key theory-practice links
145–169
Designing grammar-focused communication tasks
171–195
Assessing grammar within a framework of communicative competence
197–222
Reflections and suggestions for further study
223–227
References
229–242
Index
243–245
“This textbook offers a very accessible overview of pedagogical grammar. Firmly based in SLA and grammar theory and skilfully linking research and practice, the book helps the reader explore how grammar is taught most effectively in second language settings. It allows readers to navigate the admittedly complex pedagogical grammar landscape and to discover all the exciting things it has to offer. The book is an ideal resource for students in graduate level Applied Linguistics programs, and for pre-service and in-service teachers. Readers will appreciate its lively, descriptive style and the many practical examples that will help them spice up their grammar classes, including using online corpora to create new, effective materials. Highly recommended!”
“In Pedagogical Grammar Keck and Kim provide a comprehensive, insightful, and highly accessible guide to the description, instruction, and acquisition of second language grammar. Oriented to a language teacher audience, with careful, clear explanations and numerous illustrative examples, this hands-on book provides an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the teaching and learning of grammar.”
“Loaded with useful information for novice and experienced teachers alike, this book will go a long way in helping teachers to define and to enact their own approach to teaching grammar.”
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CJA – Language teaching theory & methods
BISAC Subject: FOR000000 – FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014030019 | Marc record