The Structure of Multimodal Dialogue II

Editors
| Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, Toronto
| LIMSI-CNRS, Orsay, France
| Institute for Perception Research (IPO), Eindhoven
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027221902 (Eur) | EUR 140.00
ISBN 9781556197628 (USA) | USD 210.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027273871 | EUR 140.00 | USD 210.00
 
Most dialogues are multimodal. When people talk, they use not only their voices, but also facial expressions and other gestures, and perhaps even touch. When computers communicate with people, they use pictures and perhaps sounds, together with textual language, and when people communicate with computers, they are likely to use mouse “gestures” almost as much as words. How are such multimodal dialogues constructed? This is the main question addressed in this selection of papers of the second “Venaco Workshop”, sponsored by the NATO Research Study Group RSG-10 on Automatic Speech Processing, and by the European Speech Communication Association (ESCA).
[Not in series, 99]  2000.  xviii, 522 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword
xiii
Prologue
1. The Structure of Dialogue
Jens Allwood
3
2. Give us the tools: a personal view of multimodal computer-human dialogue
David Hill
25
3. Integrating Multimodal Information: Evidence for Cognitive Integrality
S.J. Selcon and R.M. Taylor
63
Part I
4. Toward Multimodal Support of Interpreted Telephone Dialogues
Sharon L. Oviatt
85
5. Human Factors and Error-Handling in Speech Interfaces
A.C. Murray
109
6. Cross-linked modalities make speech drift in rapid dialogue: Global multimedia dialogue, language shifts, and emotion
S. Candelaria de Ram
125
7. Dynamic Interpretation and Dialogue Theory
Harry Bunt
139
8. Dialgoue Acts are Rational Plans
M.D. Sadek
167
9. An approach to oral dialogue modelling
E. Bilange
189
10. A Dynamic Dialogue Model for Human-Machine Communication
D. Luzzati
207
11. Standia: a pragmatically driven man-machine system
Anne Vilnat
223
12. Moves in Dialogue
Robbert-Jan Beun
239
13. Designing Intelligence: A Case of Explicit Models and Layered Protocols
Jack L. Edwards and Donald Sinclair
249
14. SPRUCE: Speech Synthesis
Marcel A.A. Tatham, P. Katherine Morton-Tatham and Eric Lewis †
271
Part 2
15. Multimedia & Multimodal Interaction Structure
Mark T. Maybury and James F. Lee
295
16. Robustness and cooperative multimodal humanmachine communication applications
Jean-Claude Junqua
309
17. Iconicity of Sign Languages
Christian Cuxac
321
18. A Taxonomy for Users’ Behaviour in Human Computer Interaction
Willis J. Edmondson
335
19. Multimodal Interaction Interface using Voice and Gesture
Daniel Teil and Yacine Bellik
349
20. Implementing an Oral and Geographic Multimodal Application: The Géoral Project
F. Gavignet, Marc Guyomard and Jacques Siroux
367
21. Communicative Acts for Multimedia and Multimodal Dialogue
Mark T. Maybury
375
22. Graphical Modes of Human Multimodal Dialogue
Ginette Boudreau and Carol McCann
393
23. Graphics and Natural Language in Multi-Modal Dialogues
James F. Lee
407
24. Referring in a Multimodal Environment: from NL to designation
Bertrand Gaiffe, Jean-Marie Pierrel and Laurent Romary
421
25. Multiplexing, Diviplexing, and the Control of Multimodal Dialogue
M. Martin Taylor and David A. Waugh
439
26. Multimodal Approach to Concept Formation: and Example in Speech and Sketch Mode
A.K. Datta
457
27. Processing Facial Images to Enhance Speech Communication
N. Michael Brooke and M.J. Tomlinson
465
28. The Intrinsic Bimodality of Speech Communication and the Synthesis of Talking Faces
C. Benoît
485
Index
503
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2001268929 | Marc record