Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Brain and Language

Editors
| Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
| Università di Parma
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027251664 (Eur) | EUR 110.00
ISBN 9781588112422 (USA) | USD 165.00
 
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027251626 (Eur) | EUR 72.00
ISBN 9781588112156 (USA) | USD 108.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027297082 | EUR 110.00/72.00*
| USD 165.00/108.00*
 
The emergence of language, social intelligence, and tool development are what made homo sapiens sapiens differentiate itself from all other biological species in the world. The use of language and the management of social and instrumental skills imply an awareness of intention and the consideration that one faces another individual with an attitude analogical to that of one’s own. The metaphor of ‘mirror’ aptly comes to mind.

Recent investigations have shown that the human ability to ‘mirror’ other’s actions originates in the brain at a much deeper level than phenomenal awareness. A new class of neurons has been discovered in the premotor area of the monkey brain: ‘mirror neurons’. Quite remarkably, they are tuned to fire to the enaction as well as observation of specific classes of behavior: fine manual actions and actions performed by mouth. They become activated independent of the agent, be it the self or a third person whose action is observed. The activation in mirror neurons is automatic and binds the observation and enaction of some behavior by the self or by the observed other. The peculiar first-to-third-person ‘intersubjectivity’ of the performance of mirror neurons and their surprising complementarity to the functioning of strategic communicative face-to-face (first-to-second person) interaction may shed new light on the functional architecture of conscious vs. unconscious mental processes and the relationship between behavioral and communicative action in monkeys, primates, and humans.

The present volume discusses the nature of mirror neurons as presented by the research team of Prof. Giacomo Rizzolatti (University of Parma), who originally discovered them, and the implications to our understanding of the evolution of brain, mind and communicative interaction in non-human primates and man.(Series B)

[Advances in Consciousness Research, 42]  2002.  viii, 392 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
1–10
I. Mirror neurons system – Past, present, and future of a discovery
11
The neural correlates of action understanding in non-human primates
Leonardo Fogassi and Vittorio Gallese
13–35
The mirror system in humans
Giacomo Rizzolatti, Laila Craighero and Luciano Fadiga
37–59
II. Further developments in the study of mirror neurons system and interpretations of its functions
61
Is the human brain unique?
Gerhard Roth
63–76
The co-evolution of language and working memory capacity in the human brain
Oliver Gruber
77–86
Episodic action memory: Characterization of the time course and neural circuitry
Ava J. Senkfor
87–99
The role of objects in imitation
Andreas Wohlschläger and Harold Bekkering
101–113
The mirror system and joint action
Günther Knoblich and Jerome Scott Jordan
115–124
Brain activation to passive observation of grasping actions
Francis McGlone, Matthew Howard, Krish Singh and Neil Roberts
125–134
Mirror neurons and the self construct
Kai Vogeley and Albert Newen
135–150
Behavioral synchronization in human conversational interaction
Jennifer L. Rotondo and Steven M. Boker
151–162
Symmetry building and symmetry breaking in synchronized movement
Steven M. Boker and Jennifer L. Rotondo
163–171
III. Mirror neurons system and the evolution of brain, communication, and language
173
On the evolutionary origin of language
Charles N. Li and Jean-Marie Hombert
175–205
Mirror neurons, vocal imitation, and the evolution of particulate speech
Michael Studdert-Kennedy
207–227
Constitutive features of human dialogic interaction: Mirror neurons and what they tell us about human abilities
Edda Weigand
229–248
Some features that make mirror neurons and human language faculty unique
Maxim I. Stamenov
249–271
Altercentric perception by infants and adults in dialogue: Ego’s virtual participation in Alter’s complementary act
Stein Bråten
273–294
Visual attention and self-grooming behaviors among four-month-old infants: Indirect evidence pointing to a developmental role for mirror neurons
Samuel W. Anderson, Marina Koulomzin, Beatrice Beebe and Joseph Jaffe
295–304
The role of mirror neurons in the ontogeny of speech
Marilyn Vihman
305–314
Mirror neurons’ registration of biological motion: A resource for evolution of communication and cognitive/linguistic meaning
Loraine McCune
315–322
Looking for neural answers to linguistic questions
Bernard H. Bichakjian
323–331
Mirror neurons and cultural transmission
India Morrison
333–340
IV. Applications
341
Mirror neurons and the neural basis for learning by imitation: Computational modeling
Aude Billard and Michael A. Arbib
343–352
Mirror neurons and feedback learning
Steve Womble and Stefan Wermter
353–362
A connectionist model which unifies the behavioral and the linguistic processes: Results from robot learning experiments
Yuuya Sugita and Jun Tani
363–376
Name index
377–383
Subject index
385–390
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Subjects

Consciousness Research

Consciousness research

Linguistics

Evolution of language

Psychology

Neuropsychology
BIC Subject: JMT – States of consciousness
BISAC Subject: PSY020000 – PSYCHOLOGY / Neuropsychology
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2002074572