Tense and Aspect in Second Language Acquisition and Learner Corpus Research

Editors
| University of Hamburg
| University of Bamberg
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027207159 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027260949 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
The expression of temporal relations, notably through tense and aspect, is central in all processes of communication, but commonly perceived and described as a major hurdle for non-native speakers. While this topic has already received considerable attention in the SLA literature, it features less prominently in recent corpus-based studies of learner language. This volume intends to close this gap. It shows which additional insights into the area of tense and aspect in learner language can be gained using corpus data, addressing the following questions: In which ways do corpus-based studies complement work based on other methods?; How can a corpus-based approach inform theories on the acquisition of tense and aspect specifically, and of language acquisition in general?; Are results language-specific or can universal principles be established?; How pervasive are effects of mode/register within learner corpus data?; What role does native and non-native input play?; Which methodological challenges come to the fore when using corpus data instead of elicited data?; How can the notion of “target(-like)” performance be operationalized for corpus material?; Which implications do the findings from the learner corpora have for the teaching and learning of the target language?

Originally published as special issue of International Journal of Learner Corpus Research 4:2 (2018)
[Benjamins Current Topics, 108]  2020.  v, 161 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Tense and aspect in Second Language Acquisition and learner corpus research
Robert Fuchs and Valentin Werner
2–21
The progressive form and its functions in spoken learner English: Tracing the effects of an exposure-rich learning environment
Lea Meriläinen
24–52
The use of stative progressives by school-age learners of English and the importance of the variable context: Myth vs. (corpus) reality
Robert Fuchs and Valentin Werner
54–82
Progressive or not progressive?: Modeling the constructional choices of EFL and ESL writers
Paula Rautionaho and Sandra C. Deshors
84–110
Arabic learners’ acquisition of English past tense morphology: Lexical aspect and phonological saliency
Helen Zhao and Yasuhiro Shirai
112–134
Can native-speaker corpora help explain L2 acquisition of tense and aspect?: A study of the “input”
Nicole Tracy-Ventura and Jhon A. Cuesta Medina
136–158
Index
159
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDC – Language acquisition
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020011987