Perspectives on Grammar Writing

Editors
| University of Oregon & SIL International
| Summer Institute of Linguistics
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027222411 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027292087 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
With over half the languages of the world currently in danger of extinction within a century, the need for high quality grammatical descriptions is more urgent than ever. Potential grammar writers, however, often find themselves paralyzed by the daunting task of describing a language. The papers in the present volume (originally published in Studies in Language 30:2 (2006)) provide suggestions and encouragement – from experienced grammar writers and users – regarding concrete methods for approaching the task of writing a descriptive grammar of a language. Salient "themes" emerging from the papers in this volume include: The necessity of community involvement in grammatical descriptions; The link between a grammar and the other products of a program of language documentation (a dictionary and collection of texts); The complementary functions of elicited vs. naturally occurring data; and grammatical description as 'art' as well as 'science'.
[Benjamins Current Topics, 11]  2007.  viii, 218 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
1–9
Contextualizing a grammar
William Bright
11–17
Writing grammars for the community
James Lokuuda Kadanya
19–23
Collective field work: Advantages or disadvantages?
Aleksandr E. Kibrik
25–44
Grammars and the community
Marianne Mithun
45–69
From parts of speech to the grammar
Pamela Munro
71–111
Grammar writing for a grammar-reading audience
Michael Noonan
113–126
A grammar as a communicative act, or what does a grammatical description really describe?
Thomas E. Payne
127–142
A typology of good grammars
Keren Rice
143–171
Thoughts on growing a grammar
David J. Weber
173–198
The linguistic example
David J. Weber
199–213
Index
215–218
“My conclusion from studying this book is that grammar writing (or a good grammar) must be both comprehensive and complete. A grammar must be written in a clear style and include many examples that are relevant and that have been carefully checked. The grammar should be readily accessible and appropriately presented, thereby enhancing the validity of the work and the author. These are also the basic concepts that all of the authors of this book address in differing but absolutely useful ways. ”
“The book provides a good starting point for anyone setting out to describe a language. It also provides a nice reference for what is expected of descriptive grammars as a genre, and I anticipate referring back to it, time and again, in the future as I expand upon my own grammar writing efforts. Although I doubt very much that there exists a description of a language that meets all the expectations presented in Perspectives on Grammar Writing, the volume is very readable and interesting, and the issues addressed are worth serious consideration and effort. ”
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1999.  In The Cambridge Handbook of Endangered Languages, Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 june 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2007024712