Evidentiality in Interaction

Editors
| Brigham Young University
| University of California, Berkeley
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027242518 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270016 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
In recent decades, linguists have significantly advanced our understanding of the grammatical properties of evidentials, but their social and interactional properties and uses have received less attention. This volume, originally published as a special issue of Pragmatics and Society (issue 3:2, 2012), draws together complementary perspectives on the social and interactional life of evidentiality, drawing on data from diverse languages, including Albanian, English, Garrwa (Pama-Nyungan, Australia), Huamalíes Quechua (Quechuan, Peru), Nanti (Arawak, Peru), and Pastaza Quichua (Quechuan, Ecuador). The language-specific studies in this volume are all based on the close analysis of discourse or communicative interaction, and examine both evidential systems of varying degrees of grammaticalization and 'evidential strategies' present in languages without grammaticalized evidentials. The analyses presented draw on conversational analysis, ethnography of communication, ethnopoetics, pragmatics, and theories of deixis and indexicality, and will be of interest to students of evidentiality in a variety of analytical traditions.
[Benjamins Current Topics, 63]  2014.  v, 199 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword
Evidentiality in social interaction
William F. Hanks
1–12
Introduction
Evidentials and evidential strategies in interactional and socio-cultural context
Janis B. Nuckolls and Lev Michael
13–20
Enhancing national solidarity through the deployment of verbal categories: How the Albanian Admirative participates in the construction of a reliable self and an unreliable other
Victor A. Friedman
21–56
From quotative other to quotative self: Evidential usage in Pastaza Quichua
Janis B. Nuckolls
57–73
Shifting voices, shifting worlds: Evidentiality, epistemic modality and speaker perspective in Quechua oral narrative
Rosaleen Howard
75–101
“Watching for witness”: Evidential strategies and epistemic authority in Garrwa conversation
Ilana Mushin
103–126
“Who knows best?”: Evidentiality and epistemic asymmetry in conversation
Jack Sidnell
127–153
Nanti self-quotation: Implications for the pragmatics of reported speech and evidentiality
Lev Michael
155–191
Index
Index
193–202
“Overall, not only from a theoretical point of view, but also from the analysis of different data presented, the book helps to understand how the social interaction perspective goes with evidentiality and evidential strategies in different languages. The articles represent the most current advances in research on this topic. Thus, I believe students and researchers who look for detailed analysis on evidentiality will benefit from reading this volume.”
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Cited by other publications

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2015. Publications Received. Language in Society 44:1  pp. 133 ff. Crossref logo
Andrade Ciudad, Luis
2020.  In Variation and Evolution [Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, 29],  pp. 76 ff. Crossref logo
Hidalgo-Downing, Laura
2017.  In Evidentiality Revisited [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 271],  pp. 225 ff. Crossref logo
Marín Arrese, Juana I.
2017.  In Evidentiality Revisited [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 271],  pp. 195 ff. Crossref logo
Mortelmans, Tanja
2017.  In Evidentiality Revisited [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 271],  pp. 123 ff. Crossref logo
Palakurthy, Kayla
2017. Marking the unexpected. Studies in Language 41:4  pp. 843 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 24 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014008329 | Marc record