New Perspectives on English Historical Linguistics

Selected papers from 12 ICEHL, Glasgow, 21–26 August 2002

Volume II: Lexis and Transmission

Editors
| University of Glasgow
| University of Glasgow
| University of Glasgow
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027247643 (Eur) | EUR 120.00
ISBN 9781588115157 (USA) | USD 180.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027295422 | EUR 120.00 | USD 180.00
 
This is the second of two volumes of papers selected from those given at the 12th International Conference on English Historical Linguistics. The first is New Perspectives on English Historical Linguistics (1): Syntax and Morphology. Together the volumes provide an overview of many of the issues that are currently engaging practitioners in the field. In this volume, the primary concern is with the historical study of the English lexicon and its sound and writing systems. Using research tools such as machine-readable text and lexical corpora, and intellectual tools such as corpus and cognitive linguistics, many of the papers move from a close study of a set of data to conclusions of theoretical significance, often concerning questions of classification and organisation. More broadly, whether concerned with lexicology or transmission, the papers have a social orientation, since neither lexicology nor phonology can be seen as divorced from its social setting.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 252]  2004.  xii, 271 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii
Introduction
ix–xii
Chancery Standard
Michael Benskin
1–40
Cant and slang dictionaries: A statistical approach
Julie Coleman
41–47
DOST: A significant instance of historical lexicography
Marace Dareau
49–64
Image schemata and light: A study in diachronic lexical domains in English
Javier E. Díaz-Vera
65–77
Loanword etymologies in the third edition of the OED: Some questions of classification
Philip Durkin
79–90
“Non olet”: Euphemisms we live by
Andreas Fischer
91–107
Intrusive [h] in present-day English accents and -insertion in medieval manuscripts: Hypercorrection or functionally-motivated language use?
Martina Häcker
109–123
Mergers, near-mergers and phonological interpretation
Raymond Hickey
125–137
New light on the verb “understand”
Carole Hough
139–149
Homophones and the stabilization of orthography in nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century English
Susan Kermas
151–162
Kailyard, conservatism and Scots in the Statistical Accounts of Scotland
Robert McColl Millar
163–176
A sociolinguistic approach to the Norse-derived words in the glosses to the Lindisfarne and Rushworth Gospels
Sara M. Pons-Sanz
177–192
Haplology in English adverb-formation
Amanda V. Pounder
193–211
Uses of Scottish place-names as evidence in historical dictionaries
Maggie Scott
213–224
On the stressing of French loanwords in English
Ann-Marie Svensson
225–234
Like like love: Comparing two modern English words diachronically
Heli Tissari
235–249
Spirantisation and despirantisation
Jerzy Welna
251–265
Name index
267
Subject index
269
Subjects

Terminology & Lexicography

Lexicography
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2004047943