Event Structure Metaphors through the Body

Translation from English to American Sign Language

| Eastern Kentucky University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027200709 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027264091 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
How do the experiences of people who have different bodies (deaf versus hearing) shape their thoughts and metaphors? Do different linguistic modes of expression (signed versus spoken) have a shaping force as well? This book investigates the metaphorical production of culturally-Deaf translators who work from English to American Sign Language (ASL). It describes how Event Structure Metaphors are handled across languages of two different modalities. Through the use of corpus-based evidence, several specific questions are addressed: are the main branches of Event Structure Metaphors – the Location and Object branches – exhibited in ASL? Are these two branches adequate to explain the event-related linguistic metaphors identified in the translation corpus? To what extent do translators maintain, shift, add, and omit expressions of these metaphors? While answering these specific questions, this book makes a significant elaboration to the two-branch theory of Event Structure Metaphors. It raises larger questions of how bilinguals handle competing conceptualizations of events and contributes to emerging interest in how body specificity, linguistic modes, and cultural context affect metaphoric variability.
[Figurative Thought and Language, 4]  2018.  xv, 224 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Typographic conventions
xiii
Acknowledgements
xv
Chapter 1. Translating metaphor through the body: Changing expressions, changing thoughts
1–16
Chapter 2. Event Structure Metaphors: Conceptualizing events through bodily experience
17–34
Chapter 3. A body of bodily expressions: A corpus-based description of metaphor translation
35–54
Chapter 4. Arriving: Understanding events in terms of bodies in locations
55–78
Chapter 5. Obtaining: Understanding events in terms of bodies possessing objects
79–94
Chapter 6. Releasing: Understanding events in terms of bodies as containers
95–127
Chapter 7. Summary of translating Event Structure Metaphors through the body
129–170
Chapter 8. Conclusion: Different bodies, different metaphor preferences?
171–184
References
185–192
Appendix A. American Freedom Speeches parallel corpus design, building, and annotation guidelines
193–209
Appendix B. American freedom speeches English source texts
211–215
Index of topics and names
217–220
Index of analyzed ASL signs
221–222
Index of conceptual metaphors and metonymies
223–224
References

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2020.  In Producing Figurative Expression [Figurative Thought and Language, 10], Crossref logo
Nacey, Susan, Aletta G. Dorst, Tina Krennmayr, W. Gudrun Reijnierse & Gerard J. Steen
2019.  In Metaphor Identification in Multiple Languages [Converging Evidence in Language and Communication Research, 22],  pp. 2 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 31 october 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018006490 | Marc record