The Dawn of Dutch

Language contact in the Western Low Countries before 1200

| Université de Lausanne
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027200204 | EUR 130.00 | USD 195.00
 
e-Book Open Access
ISBN 9789027264503
 
The Low Countries are famous for their radically changing landscape over the last 1,000 years. Like the landscape, the linguistic situation has also undergone major changes. In Holland, an early form of Frisian was spoken until, very roughly, 1100, and in parts of North Holland it disappeared even later. The hunt for traces of Frisian or Ingvaeonic in the dialects of the western Low Countries has been going on for around 150 years, but a synthesis of the available evidence has never appeared. The main aim of this book is to fill that gap. It follows the lead of many recent studies on the nature and effects of language contact situations in the past. The topic is approached from two different angles: Dutch dialectology, in all its geographic and diachronic variation, and comparative Germanic linguistics. In the end, the minute details and the bigger picture merge into one possible account of the early and high medieval processes that determined the make-up of western Dutch.
[NOWELE Supplement Series, 30]  2017.  xviii, 613 pp.
Publishing status: Available

For any use beyond this license, please contact the publisher at rights@benjamins.nl.

Table of Contents
Preface
xi–xii
Abbreviations
xiii
List of maps
xv–xvi
List of tables
xvii–xviii
Chapter 1. Aim and scope
1–2
Chapter 2. Definitions of languages and stages
3–7
Chapter 3. Sources
9–17
Chapter 4. The spelling of Dutch
19–22
Chapter 5. History of research on the ‘Frisian question’ in Belgium and the Netherlands
23–38
Chapter 6. The western Low Countries in the Early and High Middle Ages
39–62
Chapter 7. The study of language contact
63–73
Chapter 8. Working hypothesis and approach
75–112
Chapter 9. Palatalization of velars in Old and Middle Dutch
113–187
Chapter 10. Other issues involving consonants
189–202
Chapter 11. Fronting of stressed a to e
203–215
Chapter 12. Rounding of a to o
217–230
Chapter 13. Loss of nasals before voiceless fricatives
231–239
Chapter 14. Breaking of e to jo, ju
241–242
Chapter 15. WGm. *u and *o in coastal Dutch
243–390
Chapter 16. WGm. *ū
391–403
Chapter 17. WGm. *ea, *eo and *ō
405–429
Chapter 18. WGm. *ǣ
431–439
Chapter 19. Unrounding of *ǖ, *ȫ, *äü, and *iu
441–466
Chapter 20. WGm. *ai
467–504
Chapter 21. WGm. *au
505–514
Chapter 22. Summary and conclusions
515–527
Bibliography
529–559
Index
561–613
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Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2018.  In Reshaping of the Nominal Inflection in Early Northern West Germanic [NOWELE Supplement Series, 31], Crossref logo
de Vaan, Michiel
2020. Gallo-Romance lenition in Germanic loanwords. NOWELE. North-Western European Language Evolution 73:2 Crossref logo
Nedoma, Robert
2020. Südgermanische Runeninschriften. NOWELE. North-Western European Language Evolution 73:1  pp. 91 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 29 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017046929 | Marc record