Telecinematic Discourse

Approaches to the language of films and television series

Editors
Roberta Piazza | University of Sussex
ORCID logoMonika Bednarek | University of Sydney
Fabio Rossi | University of Messina
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027256157 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027285157 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
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This cutting-edge collection of articles provides the first organised reflection on the language of films and television series across British, American and Italian cultures. The volume suggests new directions for research and applications, and offers a variety of methodologies and perspectives on the complexities of "telecinematic" discourse – a hitherto virtually unexplored area of investigation in linguistics.
The papers share a common vision of the big and small screen: the belief that the discourses of film and television offer a re-presentation of our world. As such, telecinematic texts reorganise and recreate language (together with time and space) in their own way and with respect to specific socio-cultural conventions and media logic. The volume provides a multifaceted, yet coherent insight into the diegetic – as it revolves around narrative – as opposed to mimetic – as referring to other non-narrative and non-fictional genres – discourses of fictional media. The collection will be of interest to researchers, tutors and students in pragmatics, stylistics, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, communication studies and related fields.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 211] 2011.  xi, 315 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
“The articles in this collection consist mainly of in-depth case studies of particular movies or television series, which offer valuable insights in the budding study of telecinematic discourse. The contents are based on several different perspectives and methodologies (e.g. pragmatics, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, and stylistics) and most authors not only base their analysis on purely linguistic aspects but also use a multimodal approach to interpreting their data. Overall, this collection is a first step in the systematic analysis of telecinematic discourse and illustrates the need for further research in this field.”
“This volume presents a well-thought out and balanced selection of interrelated articles showing the endless possibilities for further research in this field. Indeed, one of the strengths of this volume is that its contributions feature many approaches which do not exclusively focus on the verbal channel (i.e. by taking a multimodal stance, examining the types of frames, gestures, sounds) and which stimulate cross-disciplinary analyses. [...] I would recommend this volume to scholars interested in disciplines such as Pragmatics, Corpus Linguistics, Stylistics, Film Studies and Cultural Studies.”
Telecinematic Discourse, on the whole, is groundbreaking for contemporary multimodal discourse analysis, especially in its various methodological approaches and analytical perspectives on languages of films and television series. The collection of articles explores new areas and directions for discourse analysis. [...] One noteworthy aspect is that previously most MDA research has used a systemic functional approach, while studies in this book cover disciplines of linguistics, pedagogy, psychology, semiotics and sociology. In short, this book would be an asset to students and researchers interested in pragmatics, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, communication and cultural studies.”
“This is a genuinely innovative collection of texts, examining aspects of media discourse from a variety of different linguistics-based approaches. I can imagine that a number of the chapters will be much cited as they lead to promising directions of further investigation. [...] This is a thought-provoking book, appropriate for those who wish to experiment with diverse approaches to media discourse from linguistic perspectives that take account of other modalities. The editors and publishers have done an excellent job of presentation; the texts are enhanced by careful figures and tables, and the composite index is admirable.”
Cited by

Cited by 61 other publications

Bednarek, Monika
2011. Expressivity and televisual characterization. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 20:1  pp. 3 ff. DOI logo
Bednarek, Monika
2014. ‘And they all look just the same’? A quantitative survey of television title sequences. Visual Communication 13:2  pp. 125 ff. DOI logo
Bednarek, Monika
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Bednarek, Monika & Liza-Mare Syron
2023. Functions of dialogue in (television) drama: A case study of Indigenous-authored television narratives. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 32:1  pp. 3 ff. DOI logo
Bednarek, Monika, Marcia Veirano Pinto & Valentin Werner
2021. Corpus approaches to telecinematic language. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 26:1  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Bell, Alice, Sam Browse, Alison Gibbons & David Peplow
2021. Chapter 1. Responding to style. In Style and Reader Response [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 36],  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
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2021. A linguistic typology of American television. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 26:1  pp. 127 ff. DOI logo
Boberg, Charles
2021. Accent in North American Film and Television, DOI logo
Brock, Alexander
2015. Participation frameworks and participation in televised sitcom, candid camera and stand-up comedy. In Participation in Public and Social Media Interactions [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 256],  pp. 27 ff. DOI logo
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2022. Forms of Address in Polish Nonprofessional Subtitles. In Language Use, Education, and Professional Contexts [Second Language Learning and Teaching, ],  pp. 71 ff. DOI logo
Castro, Adrián
2023. Telecinematic stylistics: Language and style in fantasy TV series. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics DOI logo
Changsong, Wang & Lucyann Kerry
2022. Filmic Depiction of Malay Subjectivity in the Late Yasmin Ahmad’s Films. SAGE Open 12:2  pp. 215824402210964 ff. DOI logo
Chepinchikj, Neda
2022. Organisation of Interaction. In Interactional Approach to Cinematic Discourse,  pp. 57 ff. DOI logo
Chepinchikj, Neda
2022. Social Actions and Gender Considerations. In Interactional Approach to Cinematic Discourse,  pp. 213 ff. DOI logo
Chepinchikj, Neda
2022. Woody Allen’s Cinematic Discourse. In Interactional Approach to Cinematic Discourse,  pp. 7 ff. DOI logo
Chepinchikj, Neda
2022. Verbal Features of Interaction. In Interactional Approach to Cinematic Discourse,  pp. 95 ff. DOI logo
Chierichetti, Luisa
2022.  Recursos (des)corteses en el diálogo telecinemático: la ironía y el sarcasmo en la serie "Vis a Vis". Revista de Lingüística y Lenguas Aplicadas 17  pp. 29 ff. DOI logo
Chovanec, Jan & Marta Dynel
2015. Researching interactional forms and participant structures in public and social media. In Participation in Public and Social Media Interactions [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 256],  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Crespo-Fernández, Eliecer
2021. Introduction. In Discourse Studies in Public Communication [Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture, 92],  pp. 2 ff. DOI logo
Davies, Mark
2021. The TV and Movies corpora. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 26:1  pp. 10 ff. DOI logo
de Pablos-Ortega, Carlos
2020. Directive Speech Acts in English and Spanish Filmspeak. Pragmática Sociocultural / Sociocultural Pragmatics 8:1  pp. 105 ff. DOI logo
Dynel, Marta
2021. When Both Utterances and Appearances are Deceptive: Deception in Multimodal Film Narrative. In Inquiries in Philosophical Pragmatics [Perspectives in Pragmatics, Philosophy & Psychology, 28],  pp. 205 ff. DOI logo
Díaz-Sierra, Sara
2022. Produced and perceived authenticity in the Northern Irish TV show Derry Girls . English World-Wide. A Journal of Varieties of English 43:2  pp. 167 ff. DOI logo
Elyamany, Nashwa
2023. Postcyberpunk dystopian cityscape and emotion artificial intelligence: A spatio-cognitive analysis of posthuman representation in Blade Runner 2049 (2017). Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies 29:5  pp. 1199 ff. DOI logo
Formentelli, Maicol
2014. Vocatives galore in audiovisual dialogue. English Text Construction 7:1  pp. 53 ff. DOI logo
Fägersten, Kristy Beers & Monika Bednarek
2022. The evolution of swearing in television catchphrases. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 31:2  pp. 196 ff. DOI logo
Gibbons, Alison & Sara Whiteley
2021. Do worlds have (fourth) walls? A Text World Theory approach to direct address inFleabag. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 30:2  pp. 105 ff. DOI logo
Harrison, Chloe
2020. ‘The truth is we’re watching each other’: Voiceover narration as ‘split self’ presentation inThe Handmaid’s Tale TV series. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 29:1  pp. 22 ff. DOI logo
Jaspers, Jürgen & Sarah Van Hoof
2015. Ceci n'est pas une Tussentaal: Evoking Standard and Vernacular Language Through Mixed Dutch in Flemish Telecinematic Discourse. Journal of Germanic Linguistics 27:1  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Kirner-Ludwig, Monika & Aleksandra Soboleva
2022. An intercultural pragmatic approach to English-Russian and English-German renditions of the formulaic "That’s what she said"-punchline in telecinematic discourse. The European Journal of Humour Research 10:3  pp. 113 ff. DOI logo
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 13 november 2023. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Main BIC Subject

CFG: Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis

Main BISAC Subject

LAN009000: LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
ONIX Metadata
ONIX 2.1
ONIX 3.0
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011015156 | Marc record