The Discourse of Online Sportscasting

Constructing meaning and interaction in live text commentary

| Masaryk University, Brno
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201683 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263339 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book offers the first comprehensive linguistic analysis of live text commentary, one of the most innovative online genres of modern news media. The study focuses on written sports commentaries in online newspapers that enable partial real-time audience involvement in the media text. Adopting an approach from interactional pragmatics, the book identifies the genre’s characteristic micro-linguistic features as well as its unique narrative structure. Live text commentary is shown to be a hybrid and multimodal text format – an internally complex form of media communication that combines elements of live spoken broadcasting, blogging, informal conversation and online chat. It aims to inform as well as entertain the audience: by using humour, banter and real or staged dialogue it seeks to create a sense of community among its readers – sports fans. The book will be of interest to many scholars in linguistic pragmatics, discourse analysis and social sciences, as well as to all others interested in modern online genres, news media and sports discourse.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 297]  2018.  xxii, 303 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
xi
Abbreviations
xiii
Transcription conventions
xv
List of figures
xvii–xviii
List of tables
xix
Preface
xxi–xxii
Chapter 1. Introduction
1–14
Part I. Locating LTC
Chapter 2. Conventionalized patterns of language variation
17–32
Chapter 3. The linguistics of sports commentary
33–52
Chapter 4. Live texts, blogging and journalism
53–84
Part II. Analysing LTC
Chapter 5. Material and characterization of data
87–117
Chapter 6. Structuring the LTC: The event and liveness
119–139
Chapter 7. From pre-match to post-match commentary
141–162
Chapter 8. Managing event discontinuities
163–184
Part III. Interacting through LTC
Chapter 9. Creating co-presence
187–225
Chapter 10. Threading and narrative layers: From interactivity to interaction
227–271
Chapter 11. Conclusion
273–278
Appendix
279–281
References
283–298
Index
299–303
“Jan Chovanec’s The Discourse of Online Sportscasting is a readable and insightful study of how live sporting events are reported in text form on-line. He uses this genre to explore several issues that are central to digital media: the emergence of new genres, the ways authors engage with readers, the development of conversationality, the use of intertextuality, and of course, the liveness that is a central part of our experience of sport. He is a subtle analyst with a thorough knowledge of the academic literature of several disciplines, and he also knows the culture of football. I recommend it for researchers on the discourse of emerging digital genres.”
“One of the recent forms of electronic communication in the internet are Live Text Commentaries (LTCs) on sports events, especially commentaries on football matches as they unfold. Jan Chovanec gives a superb and very readable introduction to this new genre, discussing its linguistic aspects with an emphasis on its pragmatic and communicative functions. I recommend the book to everyone who is interested in recent forms of internet communication (and in soccer).”
The Discourse of Online Sportscasting addresses several central issues in media discourse studies, including temporality, narrativity and constructing co-presence in contemporary networked communication. In this book, Chovanec provides a nuanced and rigorous analysis of live text sports commentary, which is sure to be of interest to scholars of discourse and pragmatics whose interests extend well beyond this particular genre.”
“The volume describes a remarkable journey of sports reporting from written coverage (newspapers), live audio coverage (radio broadcasts) and live audio-visual coverage (TV) back to written commentary, this time live, online and with audience interaction. Using the latest linguistic methods and resources it describes this new sportscasting genre which reflects the public's fascination by and addiction to digital technologies and the convergence between written and spoken language.”
“It is clear that the book provides an excellent basis for researchers of emerging media genres in and outside the field of sports communication. Because of its very clear structure and approach as well as its thorough but nevertheless focused treatment of theoretical foundations, this study is particularly suited to be used in teaching, either on sports communication more specifically or on media discourse and media genres more generally. Students planning to do a research project on any of these subjects will find this a very accessible and inspiring source and an excellent guide in methodology.”
“This is a thorough description of its empirical domain. By placing on-line live commentary within the wider literature of register and genre, and sports commentary in general, this book provides a clear account of a new sports commentary genre.”
References

References

Adami, Elisabetta
2015 “What I can (re)make Out of it: Incoherence, Non-cohesion, and Re-interpretation in YouTube Video Responses.” In Participation in Public and Social Media Interactions, ed. by Marta Dynel and Jan Chovanec, 233–257. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Alabarces, Pablo, Alan Tomlinson, and Christopher Young
2001 “Argentina versus England at the France ’98 World Cup: Narratives of Nation and the Mythologizing of the Popular.” Media, Culture & Society 23: 547–566. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Androutsopoulos, Jannis
2006 “Introduction: Sociolinguistics and Computer-mediated Communication.” In Computer-Mediated Communication, a special issue of the Journal of Sociolinguistics 10 (4): 419–438.Google Scholar
2008 “Potentials and Limitations of Discourse-Centred Online Ethnography.” Language at Internet 5. http://​www​.languageatinternet​.org​/articles​/2008​/1610Google Scholar
2010 “Localising the Global on the Participatory Web: Vernacular Spectacles as Local Responses to Global Media Flows.” In Handbook of Language and Globalization, ed. by Nikolas Coupland, 203–231. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
2014 “Moments of Sharing: Entextualization and Linguistic Repertoires in Social Networking.” Journal of Pragmatics 73: 4–18. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Arendholz, Jenny
2013(In)Appropriate Online Behaviour: A Pragmatic Analysis of Message Board Relations. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Auer, Peter
2009 “On-line Syntax: Thoughts on the Temporality of Spoken Language.” Language Sciences 31: 1–13. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ayass, Ruth, and Cornelia Gerhardt
(eds) 2012The Apppropriation of Media in Everyday Life. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bakhtin, Mikhail
1981 The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. Ed. by M. Holquist. Austin and London: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
1986 “The Problem of Speech Genres.” In Speech Genres and Other Late Essays, ed. by Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist, 60–102. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Bale, John
1998 “Virtual Fandoms: Futurescapes of Football.” In Fanatics: Power, Identity and Fandom in Football, ed. by Adam Brown, 265–278. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Baron, Naomi S.
2003 “Why Email Looks like Speech: Proofreading, Pedagogy and Public Face.” In New Media Language, ed. by Jean Aitchison and Diana M. Lewis, 85–94. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Barron, Anne, and Klaus P. Schneider
2014 “Discourse Pragmatics: Signposting a Vast Field.” In Pragmatics of Discourse, ed. by Klaus P. Schneider and Anne Barron, 1–34. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Barthes, Roland
1977 “Rhetoric of the Image.” In Image, Music, Text, ed. by Stephen Heath, 32–51. London: Fontana.Google Scholar
Barton, David
1994Literacy: An Introduction to the Ecology of Written Language. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Barton, David, and Carmen Lee
2013Language Online: Investigating Digital Texts and Practices. London and New York: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Baym, Nancy K.
2010Personal Connections in the Digital Age. Cambridge and Malden MA: Polity Press.Google Scholar
Beard, Adrian
1998The Language of Sport. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Bednarek, Monika, and Helen Caple
2012 “ ‘Value Added’: Language, Image and News Values.” Discourse, Context, Media 1: 103–113. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2014 “Why do News Values Matter? Towards a New Methodological Framework for Analysing News Discourse in Critical Discourse Analysis and Beyond.” Discourse & Society 25: 135–158. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Beers-Fägersten, Kristy
2012 “Intertextual Quotation: References to Media in Family Interaction.” In The Appropriation of Media in Everyday Life, ed. by Ruth Ayaß and Cornelia Gerhardt, 79–104. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Beißwenger, Michael
2013 “Space in Computer-mediated Communication: Corpus-based Investigations on the Use of Local Deictics in Chats.” In Space in Language and Linguistics: Geographical, Interactional, and Cognitive Perspectives, ed. by Peter Auer, Martin Hilpert, Anja Stukenbrock, and Benedikt Szmrecsanyi, 494–528. Berlin: De Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bell, Allan
1984 “Language Style as Audience Design.” Language in Society 13: 145–204. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1991 The Language of News Media. Oxford UK and Cambridge MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Benwell, Bethan
2001 “Male Gossip and Language Play in the Letters Pages of Men’s Lifestyle Magazines.” The Journal of Popular Culture 34 (4): 19–33. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Benwell, Bethan, and Elizabeth Stokoe
2006Discourse and Identity. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Bergh, Gunnar
2011“Football is War: A Case Study of Minute-by-minute Football Commentary.”. Veredas. Metáfora na Linguagem e no Pesamento 2: 83–93.Google Scholar
Bhatia, Vijay K.
1994Cognitive Structuring in Legislative Provisions.” In Language and the Law, ed. by John Gibbons, 136–155. Harlow: Longman.Google Scholar
1997The Power and Politics of Genre.” World Englishes 16 (3): 359–371. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1993Analysing Genre: Language Use in Professional Settings. London: Longman.Google Scholar
1999 “Integrating Products, Processes, Purposes and Participants in Professional Writing.” In Writing Texts, Processes and Practices, ed. by Christopher N. Candlin and Ken Hyland, 21–39. London: Longman.Google Scholar
2004Worlds of Written Discourse. A Genre-Based View. London and New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Biber, Douglas
1988Variation Across Speech and Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1989 “A Typology of English Texts.” Linguistics 27: 3–43. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1994 “An Analytical Framework for Register Studies.” In Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Register, ed. by Douglas Biber and Edward Finegan, 31–55. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
1995Dimensions of Register Variation: A Cross-Linguistic Comparison. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Biber, Douglas, and Edward Finegan
1989 “Styles of Stance in English: Lexical and Grammatical Marking of Evidentiality and Affect.” Text - Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of Discourse 9 (1): 93–124.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(eds) 1994Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Register. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Biber, Douglas, and Susan Conrad
2009Register, Genre and Style. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Biber, Douglas, Stig Johansson, Geoffrey Leech, Susan Conrad, and Edward Finegan
1999Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Bieswanger, Markus
2013 “Micro-linguistic Structural Features of Computer-mediated Communication.” In Pragmatics of Computer-Mediated Communication, ed. by Susan Herring, Dieter Stein, and Tuija Virtanen, 463–485. Berlin and Boston: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bishop, Hywell, and Adam Jaworski
2003 “We Beat ’em: Nationalism and the Hegemony of Homogeneity in the British Press Reportage of Germany versus England during Euro 2000.” Discourse and Society 14 (3): 243–271.Google Scholar
Blood, Rebecca
2002 “Weblogs: A History and Perspective.” In We’ve Got Blog: How Weblogs are Changing Our Culture, ed. by John Rodzvilla, 7–16. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing.Google Scholar
Bou-Franch, Patricia, Nuria Lorenzo-Nus, and Pilar Garcés-Conejos Blitvich
2012 “Social Interaction in YouTube Text-based Polylogues: A Study of Coherence.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 17: 501–521. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Boxer, Diana, and Florencia Cortés-Conde
1997 “From Bonding to Biting: Conversational Joking and Identity Display.” Journal of Pragmatics 27: 275–294. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Boyd, Michael S.
2014 “(New) Participatory Framework on YouTube? Commenter Interaction in US Political Speeches.” Journal of Pragmatics 72: 46–58. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brandt, Wolfgang
1983Zeitstruktur und Tempusgebrauch in Fussballreportagen des Hörfunks. Marburg: N. G. Elwert.Google Scholar
Brock, Alexander
2015 “Participation Frameworks and Participation in Televised Sitcom, Candid Camera and Stand-up Comedy.” In Participation in Public and Social Media Interactions, ed. by Marta Dynel and Jan Chovanec, 27–47. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brown, David J., and Richard Boulderstone
2008The Impact of Electronic Publishing: The Future for Publishers and Librarians. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bruns, Axel
2008Blogs, Wikipedia, Second Life and Beyond. From Production to Produsage. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Bryant, Jennings, Dan Brown, Paul W. Comisky, and Dolf Zillmann
1982 “Sports and Spectators: Commentary and Appreciation.” Journal of Communication 32 (1): 109–119. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bubel, Claudia
2008 “Film Audiences as Overhearers.” Journal of Pragmatics 40: 55–71. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Callies, Marcus, and Magnus Levin
. Forthc. “A Comparative Multimodal Corpus Study of Dislocation Structures in Live Football Commentary.” In Corpus Approaches to the Language of Sports: Texts, Media, Modalities ed. by Marcus Callies and Magnus Levin. London: Bloomsbury.
Campbell, Paul
Cap, Piotr
2011 “Micropragmatics and Macropragmatics.” In Foundations of Pragmatics, ed. by Wolfram Bublitz and Neal Norrick, 51–75. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter Mouton.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Chafe, Wallace
2008 “Aspects of Discourse Analysis.” Brno Studies in English 34: 23–37.Google Scholar
Cheong, Yin Yuen
2004 “The Construal of Ideational Meaning in Print Advertisements.” In Multimodal Discourse Analysis, ed. by Kay L. O’Halloran, 163–195. London and New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Chilton, Paul, and Christina Schäffner
2002 “Introduction: Themes and Principles in the Analysis of Political Discourse.” In Politics as Text and Talk: Analytical Approaches to Political Discourse, ed. by Paul Chilton and Christina Schäffner, 1–41. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Chovanec, Jan
2005a “Czeching Out Puns and Clichés in Football Reporting.” Theory and Practice in English Studies 3: 61–67.Google Scholar
2005b “From Zeroo to Heroo: Word-play and Wayne Rooney in the British Press.” Slovak Studies in English I. Bratislava: Comenius University, 85–99.Google Scholar
2006 “Competitive Verbal Interaction in Online Minute-by-minute Match Reports.” Brno Studies in English 32: 23–35. http://​hdl​.handle​.net​/11222​.digilib​/104090Google Scholar
2008a “Enacting an Imaginary Community: Infotainment in On-line Minute-by-minute Sports Commentaries.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 255–268. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
2008b “Focus on Form: Foregrounding Devices in Football Reporting.” Discourse & Communication 2 (3): 219–243. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009a “ ‘Call Doc Singh!” Textual Structure and Coherence in Live Text Commentary.” In Cohesion and Coherence in Spoken and Written Discourse, ed. by Olga Dontcheva-Navratilova and Renata Povolná, 124–137. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
2009b “Joint Construction of Humour in Quasi-conversational Interaction”. In Humor. Teorie, praktyka, zastosowania / Humour. Theories, Applications, Practices, Vol. 2/2: Making Sense of Humour, ed. by Alina Kwiatkowska and Sylwia Dżereń-Głowacka, 11–25. Piotrków Trybunalski: Naukowe Wydawnictwo Piotrkowskie.Google Scholar
2009c “Simulation of Spoken Interaction in Written Online Media Texts.” Brno Studies in English 35 (2): 109–128. http://​hdl​.handle​.net​/11222​.digilib​/105142Google Scholar
2010a “Chatová diskuze jako součást internetové sportovní publicistiky.” [Chat discussion as an integral part of online sports commentary]. In Varia XVII, 172–182. Ružomberok-Bratislava: Katolická univerzita v Ružomberku a Slovenská jazykovedná spoločnosť pri SAV.
2010b “Online Discussion and Interaction: The Case of Live Text Commentary.” In Cases in Online Discussion and Interaction, ed. by Leonard Shedletsky and Joan E. Aitken, 234–251. Hershey: IGI Publishing. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “Humour in Quasi-conversations: Constructing Fun in Online Sports Journalism.” In The Pragmatics of Humour across Discourse Domains, ed. by Marta Dynel, 243–264. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012 “Conversational Humour and Joint Fantasizing in Online Journalism.” In Language and Humour in the Media, ed. by Jan Chovanec and Isabel Ermida, 139–161. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
2014The Pragmatics of Tense and Time in News. From Canonical Headlines to Online News Texts. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2015 “Participant roles and Embedded Interactions in Online Sports Broadcasts.” In Participation in Public and Social Media Interactions, ed. by Marta Dynel and Jan Chovanec, 67–95. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2016 “Eavesdropping on Media Talk: Microphone Gaffes and Unintended Humour in Sports Broadcasts.” Journal of Pragmatics 95: 93–106. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2017a “Participating with Media: Exploring Online Media Activity.” In The Routledge Handbook of Language and Media, ed. by Colleen Cotter and Daniel Perrin, 505–522. London and New York: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2017b “Wordplay and Football: Humour in the Discourse of Written Sports Reporting.” In Humorous Discourse, ed. by Władysław Chłopicki and Dorota Brzozowska, 131–154. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2018 “ ‘Text Sex with Becks’: Football Celebrities, Popular Press, and the Spectacle of Language.” In The Aesthetics, Poetics, and Rhetoric of Soccer, ed. by Ridvan Askin, Catherine Diederich, and Aline Bieri, 200–226. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
. Forthc. “‘Nice Try, Loser’: Participant Structures and Embedded Frames of Interaction in Media Broadcasts.”
Chovanec, Jan, and Marta Dynel
2015 “Researching Interactional Forms and Participant Structures in Public and Social Media.” In Participation in Public and Social Media Interactions, ed. by Marta Dynel and Jan Chovanec, 1–23. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Clayman, Stephen
1992 “Footing in the Achievement of Neutrality: The Case of News Interview Discourse.” In Talk at Work, ed. by Paul Drew and John Heritage, 163–198. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Comisky, Paul, Jennings Bryant, and Dolf Zillmann
1977 “Commentary as a Substitute for Action.” Journal of Communication 27 (3): 150–153. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Conboy, Martin
2006Tabloid Britain: Constructing a Community Through Language. Abingdon and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Corbett, John
2006 “Genre and Genre Analysis.” In Concise Encyclopedia of Pragmatics, ed. by Jacob L. Mey, 286–292. Oxford: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Cotter, Colleen
2010News Talk. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cruz-Saco, Alvaro
1987Fussballreportagen im peruanischen und deutschen Hörfunk. Eine empirische, sprachvergleichende Untersuchung. Freiburg im Breisgau: Hochschulverlag.Google Scholar
Crystal, David
2001Language and the Internet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Crystal, David, and Derek Davy
1969Investigating English Style. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
Danet, Brenda, and Susan C. Herring
(eds) 2007The Multilingual Internet: Language, Culture, and Communication Online. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Delin, Judy
2000The Language of Everyday Life. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Deuze, Mark
2003 “The Web and its Journalisms: Considering the Consequences of Different Types of News Media Online.” New Media & Society 5 (2): 203–230. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dor, Daniel
2003 “On Newspaper Headlines as Relevance Optimizers.” Journal of Pragmatics 35 (5): 695–721.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dresner, Eli
2005 “The Topology of Auditory and Visual Perception, Linguistic Communication, and Interactive Written Discourse.” Language  at Internet  2. http://​www​.languageatinternet​.org​/articles​/2005​/161Google Scholar
Dynel, Marta
2009 “Beyond a Joke: Types of Conversational Humour.” Language and Linguistics Compass 3 (5): 1284–1299. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “ ‘You Talking to Me? The Viewer as a Ratified Listener to Film Discourse.” Journal of Pragmatics 43: 1628–1644. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2014 “Participation Framework Underlying YouTube Interaction.” Journal of Pragmatics 73: 37–52. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Easthope, Anthony
1990What a Man’s Gotta Do: The Masculine Myth in Popular Culture. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Eggins, Suzanne, and Diana Slade
1997Analysing Casual Conversation. London and New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Eggins, Suzanne, and J. R. Martin
1997 “Genres and Registers of Discourse.” In Discourse as Structure and Process, ed. by Teun A. van Dijk, 230–256. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Ekström, Mats, Göran Eriksson, and Åsa Kroon Lundell
2013 “Live Co-produced News: Emerging Forms of News Production and Presentation on the Web.” Media, Culture & Society 35 (5): 620–639. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fairclough, Norman
1989Language and Power. London and New York: Longman.Google Scholar
1992Discourse and Social Change. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
1995Media Discourse. London and New York: Hodder Arnold.Google Scholar
2003Analysing Discourse: Textual Analysis for Social Research. Abingdon: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ferguson, Charles A.
1983 “Sports Announcer Talk. Syntactic Aspects of Register Variation.” Language in Society 12: 153–172. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ferrara, Kathleen, Hans Brunner, and Greg Wittemore
1991 “Interactive Written Discourse as an Emergent Register.” Written Communication 8 (1): 8–34. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fetzer, Anita
2006 “ ‘Minister, We Will See how the Public Judges You.’ Media References in Political Interviews.” Journal of Pragmatics 38: 180–195. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fine, Gary Alan, and Michaela de Soucey
2005 “Joking Cultures: Humor Themes as Social Regulation in Group Life.” Humor – International Journal of Humor Research 18 (1): 1–22. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fowler, Roger
1991Language in the News. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
1996Linguistic Criticism, 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Georgakopoulou, Alexandra
2003 “Computer-mediated Communication.” In Handbook of Pragmatics, ed. by Jeff Verschueren, Jan-Ola Östman, Jan Blommaert, and C. Bulcaen, 1–21. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2006 “Postscript: Computer-mediated Communication in Sociolinguistics.” Journal of Sociolinguistics 10 (4): 548–557. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gerhardt, Cornelia
2006 “Moving Closer to the Audience: Watching Football on Television.” Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses 19: 125–148. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008 “Turn-by-turn and Move-by-move: A Multi-modal Analysis of Live Football Commentary.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 283–294. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
2009 “Multimodal and Intertextual Humor in the Media Reception Situation: The Case of Watching Football on TV.” In Humor in Interaction, ed. by Neal R. Norrick and Delia Chiaro, 79–97. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2014Appropriating Live Televised Football through Talk. Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ghadessy, Mohsen
1988 “The Language of Written Sports Commentary: Soccer – a Description.” In Registers of Written English: Situational Factors and Linguistic Features, ed. by Mohsen Ghadessy, 17–51. London and New York: Pinter Publishers.Google Scholar
Gibbons, John
2003Forensic Linguistics: An Introduction to Language in the Justice System. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.Google Scholar
Gibbons, Tom, and Kevin Dixon
2010 “ ‘Surf’s up!’: A Call to Take English Soccer Fan Interactions on the Internet more Seriously.” Soccer & Society 11 (5): 599–613. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Giera, Irene, Erika Giorgianni, Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler
2008 “The Globalized Football Team: A Research Project on Multilingual Communication.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 375–390. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
Gillespie, Marie, and Ben O’Loughlin
2015 “Editorial Introduction: International News, Social Media and Soft Power: The London and Sochi Olympics as Global Media Events.” Participations – Journal of Audience & Reception Studies 12 (1): 388–412.Google Scholar
Goffman, Erving
1981Forms of Talk. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, Charles
2007 “Interactive Footing.” In Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction, ed. by Elizabeth Holt and Rebecca Clift, 16–46. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Gregoriou, Christiana
2009English Literary Stylistics. London: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Grochala, Beata
2012 “Komentarz (sportowy), relacja (sportowa), sprawozdanie (sportowe) – przegląd stanowisk.” Folia Litteraria Polonica 3 (17): 95–105.Google Scholar
Gumperz, John J.
1982Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K.
1978Language as Social Semiotic: The Social Interpretation of Language and Meaning. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
1994An Introduction to Functional Grammar. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K., and Ruqaiya Hasan
1976Cohesion in English. London: Longman.Google Scholar
1985Language, Context and Text: Aspects of Language in a Social Perspective. Geelong, Vic.: Deakin University Press.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K., Angus McIntosh, and Peter Strevens
1964The Linguistic Sciences and Language Teaching. London: Longmans.Google Scholar
Harcup, Tony, and Deirdre O’Neill
2001 “What Is News? Galtung and Ruge revisited.” Journalism Studies 2 (2): 261–280. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hasan, Ruqayia
1996Ways of Saying, Ways of Meaning. Selected Papers of Ruqayia Hasan. London: Cassell.Google Scholar
2005 “Language and Society in a Systemic Functional Perspective.” In Continuing Discourse on Language. Volume 1: A Functional Perspective, ed. by Ruqaiya Hasan, Christian Matthiessen, and Jonathan J. Webster, 55–80. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Haupt, Jaromír
2014 “Contrastive Relations, Evaluation, and Generic Structure in Science News.” In The Pragmatics of Discourse Coherence: Theories and Applications, ed. by Helmut Gruber and Gisela Redeker, 53–83. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hauser, Stefan
2008 “Live-Ticker: Ein neues Medienangebot zwischen medienspezifischen Innovationen und stilistischem Trägheitsprinzip.” In kommunikation at gesellschaft, Jg. 9, Forschungsnotiz 1.Online-Publikation: http://​www​.soz​.uni​-frankfurt​.de​/K​.G​/F1​_2008​_Hauser​.pdfGoogle Scholar
2009 “Sport ‘onlive’ – Medien-und textlinguistische Anmerkungen zur webbasierten Mediengattung ‘Live-Ticker’.” In Sport und Medien. Aktuelle Befunde mit Blick auf die Schweiz, ed. by Daniel Beck und Steffen Kolb, 71–90. Zürich and Chur: Rüegger.Google Scholar
2010 “Der Live-Ticker in der Online-Berichterstattung: zur Entstehung einer neuen Mediengattung.” In Neue Medien – neue Formate. Ausdifferenzierung und Konvergenz in der Medienkommunikation, ed. by Hans-Jürgen Bucher, Thomas Gloning, and Katrin Lehnen, 207–225. Frankfurt, New York: Campus.Google Scholar
Herring, Susan
1996 “Computer-Mediated Discourse Analysis. Introduction.” Electronic Journal of Communication 6 (3): 1–3.Google Scholar
1999 “Interactional Coherence in CMC.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 4 (4). http://​jcmc​.indiana​.edu​/vol4​/issue4​/herring​.html CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Herring, Susan, and Jannis Androutsopoulos
2015 “Computer-mediated Discourse 2.0.” In The Handbook of Discourse Analysis, 2nd ed., ed. by Deborah Tannen, Heidi E. Hamilton, and Deborah Schiffrin, 127–151. Malden MA and Oxford: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Herring, Susan C.
2004 “Computer-mediated Discourse Analysis: An Approach to Researching Online Behavior.” In Designing for Virtual Communities in the Service of Learning, ed. by Sasha Barab, Rob Kling, and James H. Gray, 338–376. New York: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(ed) 1996Computer Mediated Communication. Linguistic, Social and Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Herring, Susan C., Dieter Stein, and Tuija Virtanen
2013Handbook of Pragmatics of CMC. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Herring, Susan C., Lois Ann Scheidt, Sabrina Bonus, and Elijah Wright
2004 “Bridging the Gap: A Genre Analysis of Weblogs.” In Proceedings of the 37th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences .
Herring, Susan, Dieter Stein, and Tuija Virtanen
(eds) 2013Pragmatics of Computer-Mediated Interaction. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hobbs, Jerry R.
1990 “Topic Drift.” In Conversational Organization and its Development, ed. by Bruce Dorval, 3–22. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
Hoey, Michael
1986 “The Discourse Colony: A Preliminary Study of a Neglected Discourse Type.” In Talking about Text: Studies Presented to David Brazil on his Retirement, ed. by Malcolm Coulthard, 1–26. Birmingham: Birmingham University.Google Scholar
2001Textual Interaction: An Introduction to Written Discourse Analysis. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hoffmann, Christian R.
2012Cohesive Profiling: Meaning and Interaction in Personal Weblogs. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, Michael E.
1995 “ ‘New Media Analysis’: Naming Virtual Space in Computer-mediated Conversation.” ETC: A Review of General Semantics 52 (2): 212–221.Google Scholar
Horton, Donald, and Richard R. Wohl
1956 “Mass Communication and Para-social Interaction: Observations on Intimacy at a Distance.” Psychiatry 19: 215–229. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hoyle, Susan M.
1993 “Participation Frameworks in Sportscasting Play: Imaginary and Literal Footings.” In Framing in Discourse, ed. by Deborah Tannen, 114–145. USA: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hutchby, Ian
2006Media Talk: Conversational Analysis and the Study of Broadcasting. Maidenhead and New York: Open University Press.Google Scholar
Hyland, Ken
2002 “Genre: Language, Context, and Literacy.” Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 22: 113–135. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Genre and Discourse Analysis in Language for Specific Purposes.” In The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics, ed. by Carol A. Chapelle. Wiley-Blackwell. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Iedema, Rick, Susan Feez, and Peter White
1994Media Literacy. Sydney: Disadvantaged Schools Program, NSW Department of School Education.Google Scholar
Irvine, Judith T.
1996 “Shadow Conversations: The Indeterminacy of Participant Roles.” In Natural Histories of Discourse, ed. by Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban, 131–159. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
Jacobs, Geert
1999Preformulating the News: An Analysis of the Metapragmatics of Press Releases. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jakobson, Roman
1960 “Closing Statement: Linguistics and Poetics.” In Style in Language, ed. by Thomas A. Sebeok, 350–377. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Jenkins, Henry
2006Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York and London: New York University Press.Google Scholar
Johnson, Sally
1994 “A Game of Two Halves? On Men, Football and Gossip.” Journal of Gender Studies 3 (2): 145–154. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, Sally, and Frank Finlay
1997 “Do Men Gossip? An Analysis of Football Talk on Television.” In Language and Masculinity, ed. by Ulrike H. Meinhof and Sally Johnson, 130–143. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Johnstone, Barbara
2008Discourse Analysis. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Jucker, Andreas H.
2003 “Mass Media Communication at the Beginning of the Twenty-first Century: Dimensions of Change.” Journal of Historical Pragmatics 4 (1): 129–148. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2006Live Text Commentaries. Read about it while it Happens.” In Neuere Entwicklungen in der linguistischen Internetforschung. Zweites internationales Symposium zur gegenwärtigen linguistischen Forschung über computervermittelte Kommunikation. Universität Hannover, 4.-6. Oktober 2004 (Germanistische Linguistik 186–187), ed. by Jannis K. Androutsopoulos, Jens Runkehl, Peter Schlobinski und Torsten Siever, 113–131. Hildesheim: Georg Olms.Google Scholar
2010 “ ‘Audacious, brilliant!! What a strike!’: Live Text Commentaries on the Internet as Real-time Narratives.” In Narratives Revisited. Telling a Story in the Age of New Media, ed. by Christian R. Hoffmann, 57–77. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jung, Kerstin
2008 “World Cup Football Live on Spanish and Argentine Television: The Spectacle of Language.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 343–358. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
Kennedy, Eileen, and Laura Hills
2009Sport, Media and Society. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Knox, John
2007 “Visual-verbal Communication on Online Newspaper Home Pages.” Visual Communication 6 (1): 19–53. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kopaczyk, Joanna, and Andreas H. Jucker
(eds) 2013Communities of Practice in the History of English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kuiper, Koenraad
1996Smooth Talkers: Linguistic Performance of Auctioneers and Sportscasters. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Inc.Google Scholar
2009Formulaic Genres. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kuiper, Koenraad, and Robyn Lewis
2013 “The Effect of the Broadcast Medium on the Language of Radio and Television Sports Commentary Genres: The Rugby Union Lineout.” Journal of Sports Media 8 (2): 31–51. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kuo, Sai-Hua
2003 “Involvement vs Detachment: Gender Differences in the Use of Personal Pronouns in Televised Sports in Taiwan.” Discourse Studies 5 (4): 479–494. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kytölä, Samu
2013Multilingual Language Use and Metapragmatic Reflexivity in Finnish Internet Football Forums: A Study in the Sociolinguistics of Globalization. Jyväskylä: University of Jyväskylä.Google Scholar
Kytölä, Samu, and Jannis Androutsopoulos
2012 “Ethnographic Perspectives on Multilingual Computer-mediated Discourse: Insights from Finnish Football Forums on the Web.” In Multilingualism, Discourse and Ethnography, ed. by Sheena Gardner and Marilyn Martin-Jones, 179–196. New York and Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
Labov, William
1972 “Rules for Ritual Insults.” In Language in the Inner City, ed. by William Labov, 297–353. Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press.Google Scholar
1997 “Some Further Steps in Narrative Analysis”. The Journal of Narrative and Life history 7 (1–4): 395–415. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lauerbach, Gerda
2006 “Discourse Representation in Political Interviews: The Construction of Identities and Relations through Voicing and Ventriloquizing.” Journal of Pragmatics 38 (2): 196–215. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lavric, Eva, Gerhard Pisek, Wolfgang Stadler, Andrew Skinner, and Erika Giorgianni
2008 “ ‘Zidane, Zidane, What have you Done?’: Emotions on TV in Six Languages.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 359–372. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
Lee, Carmen K. M.
2011 “Microblogging and status updates on Facebook: Texts and Practices.” In Digital Discourse: Language in the New Media, ed. by Crispin Thurlow and Kristine Mroczek, 110–128. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Leech, Geoffrey N., and Michael N. Short
1981Style in Fiction: A Linguistic Introduction to English Fictional Prose. London and New York: Longman.Google Scholar
Leech, Geoffrey, Marianne Hundt, Christian Mair, and Nicholas Smith
2009Change in Contemporary English: A Grammatical Study. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Leitner, Gerhard
1997 “The Sociolinguistics of Communication Media.” In The Handbook of Sociolinguistics, ed. by Florian Coulmas, 187–204. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Lewandowski, Marcin
2008 “The Language of Soccer – a Sociolect or a Register.” In Język, Komunikacja, Informacja / Language, Communication, Information 3, ed. by Piotr Nowak and Paweł Nowakowski, 21–32. Poznań: Sorus.Google Scholar
2012 “Football is not the Only War. Non-violence Metaphors in English and Polish Soccer Language.” In Sprache und Fußball im Blickpunkt linguistischer Forschung, ed. by Janusz Taborek, Artur Tworek, and Lech Zieliński, 79–95. Hamburg: Verlag Dr. Kovač.Google Scholar
Lewis, Diana M.
2003 “Online News: A New Genre?” In New Media Language, ed. by Jean Aitchison and Diana M. Lewis, 95–104. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Ljung, Magnus
2000 “Newspaper Genres and Newspaper English.” In English Media Texts, Past and Present, ed. by Friedrich Ungerer, 131–149. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Locher, Miriam A.
2014 “Electronic Discourse.” In Pragmatics of Discourse, ed. by Klaus P. Schneider and Anne Barron, 555–582. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lundell, Åsa Kroon
2014 “Cross-platform Television: Superliveness, Metadiscourse and Complex Audience Orientation in a Sports Journalism Production on the Web.” Northern Lights: Film & Media Studies Yearbook 12 (1): 11–27. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mackenzie, Lachlan J.
2005 “Incremental Functional Grammar and the Language of Football Commentary.” In The Dynamics of Language Use. Functional and Contrastive Perspectives, ed. by Christopher S. Butler, Maria de los Ángeles Gómez-González, andSusana M. Doval Suárez, 113–128. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2010 “More Tiles on the Roof: Further Thoughts on Incremental Language Production.” In Language Usage and Language Structure, ed. by Kasper Boye and Elisabeth Engberg-Pedersen, 263–294. Berlin and New York: de Gruyter Mouton.Google Scholar
Markman, Kris M.
2005To Send or not to Send: Turn Construction in Computer-mediated Chat.” Texas Linguistic Forum 48: 115–124.Google Scholar
2013Conversational Coherence in Small Group Chat”. In Pragmatics of Computer-Mediated Communication, ed. by Susan Herring, Dieter Stein, and Tuija Virtanen, 539–564. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Marriott, Stephanie
1996 “Time and Time Again: ‘Live’ Television Commentary and the Construction of Replay Talk.” Media, Culture & Society 27: 69–86. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007Live Television: Time, Space and the Broadcast Event. Los Angeles and London: Sage.Google Scholar
Martin, J. R.
1992English Text: System and Structure. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Martin, J. R., and David Rose
2007Working with Discourse: Meaning Beyond the Clause, 2nd ed. London and New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Matheson, Donald
2005Media Discourses: Analysing Media Texts. Maidenhead and New York: Open University Press.Google Scholar
Matthiessen, Christian M. I. M.
2007 “The ‘Architecture’ of Language According to Systemic Functional Theory: Developments Since the 1970s.” In Continuing Discourse on Language, Vol. 2, ed. by Ruqaiya Hasan, Christian M. I. M. Matthiessen, and Jonathan Webster, 505–561. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
McCarthy, Brigid
2014 “A Sports Journalism of their Own: An Investigation into the Motivations, Behaviours, and Media Attitudes of Fan Sports Bloggers.” Communication & Sport 2 (1): 65–79. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
McCarthy, Michael
1998Spoken Language and Applied Lingustics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
McNeill, Laurie
2009 “Brave New Genre or Generic Colonialism? Debates Over Ancestry in Internet Diaries.” In Genres in the Internet: Issues in the Theory of Genre, ed. by Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein, 143–163. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Meier, Simon
2017 “Corpora for Football Linguistics – a Multilingual Research Resource on the Language of Football Reports.” Zeitschrift für germanistische Linguistik 42 (2): 345–349. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
. Forthc. “Formulaic Language and Text Routines in Football Live Text Commentaries and Match Reports – a Cross- and Corpus-linguistic Approach.” In Corpus Approaches to the Language of Sports: Texts, Media, Modalities ed. by Marcus Callies and Magnus Levin. London: Bloomsbury.
Miller, Carolyn, and Dawn Shepherd
2004 “Blogging as Social Action: A Genre Analysis of the Weblog.” In Into the Blogosphere: Rhetoric, Community, and Culture of Weblogs, ed. by Laura J. Gurak, Smiljana Antonijevic, Laurie Johnson, Clancy Ratliff, and Jessica Reyman. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota.Google Scholar
2009 “Questions for Genre Theory from the Blogosphere.” In Genres in the Internet: Issues in the Theory of Genre, ed. by Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein, 263–290. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Montera-Fleta, Begoña, Anna Montesinos-López, Carmen Pérez-Sabater, and Ed Turney
2009 “Computer Mediated Communication and Informalization of Discourse: The Influence of Culture and Subject Matter.” Journal of Pragmatics 41 (4): 770–779. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Montgomery, Martin
1986 “DJ Talk.” Media, Culture & Society 8: 421–440. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007The Discourse of Broadcast News. A Linguistic Approach. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Mukařovský, Jan
1964[1932] “Standard Language and Poetic Language.” In A Prague School Reader on Esthetics, Literary Structure, and Style, ed. by Paul L. Garvin, 17–30. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
Müller, Torsten
2007Football, Language and Linguistics. Time-critical Utterances, their Relation to Non-linguistic Situations and Events. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
2008a “An Important Type of Unplanned Spoken Language: A Brief History of Football Commentary in England and Germany.” Brno Studies in English 34: 63–78.Google Scholar
2008b “ ‘He Held his Head in his Hands as it Flashed Past the Post’: How Grammar and Football Interact.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 269–282. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
Murrells, Katy
2012 “Novak Djokovic vs. Rafael Nadal: LIVE UPDATES Of Australian Open Men's Final 2012.” http://​splendor​-heliport​.blogspot​.com​/2012​/01​/novak​-djokovic​-vs​-rafael​-nadal​-live​.html
Myers, Greg
2010The Discourse of Blogs and Wikis. London and New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Newman, Nic
2009 “The Rise of Social Media and its Impact on Mainstream Journalism: A Study of how Newspapers and Broadcasters in the UK and US are Responding to a Wave of Participatory Social Media, and a Historic Shift in Control towards Individual Consumers.” A working paper. Oxford: University of Oxford, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. http://​www​.sssup​.it​/UploadDocs​/6635​_8​_S​_The​_rise​_of​_Social​_Media​_and​_its​_Impact​_on​_mainstream​_journalism​_Newman​_07​.pdf
Nordin, Henrik
2008 “The Use of Conceptual Metaphors by Swedish and German Football Commentators – a Comparison.” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 113–120. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
Norrick, Neal R.
1993Conversational Joking: Humor in Everyday Talk. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
1994 “Involvement and Joking in Conversation.” Journal of Pragmatics 22: 409–430. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004 “Issues in Conversational Joking.” Journal of Pragmatics 35: 1333–1359. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
O’Keeffe, Anne
2006Investigating Media Discourse. Abingdon and New York: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
O’Sullivan, Tim, John Hartley, Danny Saunders, Martin Montgomery, and John Fiske
1994Key Concepts in Communication and Cultural Studies, 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Page, Ruth
2015 “The Narrative Dimensions of Social Media Storytelling: Options for Linearity and Tellership.” In The Handbook of Narrative Analysis, ed. by Anna De Fina and Alexandra Georgakopoulou, 329–348. Oxford and Malden MA: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Google Scholar
Paltridge, Brian
1995 “Working with Genre. A Pragmatic Perspective.” Journal of Pragmatics 24 (4): 393–406. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Paolillo, John C., and Asta Zelenkauskaite
2013 “Real-time Chat.” In Pragmatics of Computer-Mediated Communication, ed. by Susan Herring, Dieter Stein,Tuija Virtanen and , 109–133. Berlin and Boston: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Patrona, Marianna
2015 “Synthetic Personalisation.” In The International Encyclopedia of Language and Social Interaction, ed. by Karen Tracy, Todd Sandel, and Cornelia Ilie, 1458–1464. Malden, MA and Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pérez-Sabater, Carmen, Gemma Peña-Martínez, Begoña Montera Fleta, and Edmund Turney
2007 “A Developing CMC Genre: Online Sports Broadcasts.” ISCAL, 190–196.Google Scholar
Pérez-Sabater, Carmen, Gemma Peña-Martínez, Ed Turney, and Begoña Montero-Fleta
2008 “A Spoken Genre gets Written: Online Football Commentaries in English, French, and Spanish.” Written Communication 25 (2): 235–261. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Porto López, Pablo
2014 “Minuto a minuto: ¿El live blogging como nueva instancia de construcción del acontecimiento en directo?Letra. Imagen. Sonido L. I. S. Ciudad Mediatizada Ańo VI, # 11. Buenos Aires, 127–150.Google Scholar
Puschmann, Cornelius
2013 “Blogging.” In Pragmatics of Computer-Mediated Communication, ed. by Susan Herring, Dieter Stein, and Tuija Virtanen, 83–108. Berlin and Boston: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Reaser, Jeffrey
2003 “A Quantitative Approach to (Sub) Registers: the Case of Sports Announcer Talk.” Discourse Studies 5 (3): 303–321.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Reinardy, Scott, and Wayne Wanta
2009The Essentials of Sports Reporting and Writing. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Riboni, Giorgia
2014 “Constructing (cyber-)space on Twitter: A Study of Place Deixis in Tweets.” In Space, Place and the Discursive Construction of Identity, ed. by Julia Bamford, Franca Poppi, and Davide Mazzi, 217–236. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Richardson, John E.
2007Analysing Newspapers. An Approach from Critical Discourse Analysis. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Richardson, Kay
2010Television Dramatic Dialogue: A Sociolinguistic Study. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, Dan
2012 “Newsdesk Live: the Next Phase of Our Open Commissioning Project.” The Guardian, 30 January 2012 https://​www​.theguardian​.com​/help​/insideguardian​/2012​/jan​/30​/newsdesk​-live​-next​-phase​-commissioningGoogle Scholar
Ryan, Marie-Laure
1993 “Narrative in Real Time: Chronicle, Mimesis and Plot in the Baseball Broadcast.” Narrative 1 (2): 138–155.Google Scholar
Sandvoss, Cornel
2004 “Technological Evolution or Revolution? Sport Online Live Internet Commentary as Postmodern Cultural Form.” Convergence 10 (3): 39–54. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Scannell, Paddy
2014Television and the Meaning of Live. Cambridge and Malden MA: Polity Press.Google Scholar
Schiffrin, Deborah
1993 “ ‘Speaking for Another’ in Sociolinguistic Interviews: Alignments, Identities, and Frames.” In Framing in Discourse, ed. by Deborah Tannen, 231–263. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Schirato, Tony
2013Sports Discourse. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Schneider, Klaus P., and Anne Barron
2008 “Where Pragmatics and Dialectology Meet: Introducing Variational Pragmatics.” In Variational Pragmatics, ed. by Klaus P. Schneider and Anne Barron, 1–32. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Scollon, Ron
1998Mediated Discourse as Social Interaction: A Study of News Discourse. Abingdon and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Semino, Elena, and Mick Short
2004Corpus Stylistics: Speech, Writing and Thought Presentation in a Corpus of English Writing. London and New York: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Simpson, James
2005. “Learning Electronic Literacy Skills in an Online Language Learning Community.” Computer Assisted Language Learning 18 (4): 327–345.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sinclair, John McHardy, and Malcolm Coulthard
1975Toward an Analysis of Discourse: The English Used by Teachers and Pupils. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Steensen, Steen
2011 “Cozy Journalism. The Rise of Social Cohesion as an Ideal in Online, Participatory Journalism.” Journalism Practice 5: 687–703. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012 “Conversing the Fans: ‘CoveritLive’ and the Social Function of Journalism.” In We Love to Hate Each Other: Mediated Football Fan Culture, ed. by Roy Krøvel and Thore Roksvold, 207–228. Gothenburg: Nordicom.Google Scholar
2014 “Conversing the Audience: A Methodological Exploration of how Conversation Analysis can Contribute to the Analysis of Interactive Journalism.” New Media & Society 16 (8): 1197–1213. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stommel, Wyke
2008 “Conversation Analysis and Community of Practice as Approaches to Studying Online Community.” Language at Internet 5: 1–22.Google Scholar
Storrer, Angelika
2001 “Sprachliche Besonderheiten getippter Gespräche: Sprecherwechsel und sprachliches Zeigen in der Chat-Kommunikation.” In Chat-Kommunikation. Sprache, Interaktion, Sozialität & Identität in synchroner computervermittelter Kommunikation. Perspektiven auf ein interdisziplinäres Forschungsfeld, ed. by Michael Beißwenger, 3–24. Stuttgart: ibidem.Google Scholar
Swales, John
1990Genre Analysis: English in Academic and Research Settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
2000 “Languages for Specific Purposes.” Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 20: 59–76. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004Research Genres. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tagg, Caroline
2012Discourse of Text Messaging: Analysis of SMS Communication. London and New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Talbot, Mary
1995 “A Synthetic Sisterhood.” In Gender Articulated. Language and the Socially Constructed Self, ed. by Kira Hall and Mary Bucholz, 143–165. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
2007Media Discourse. Representation and Interaction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Tannen, Deborah
2004 “Talking the Dog: Framing Pets as Interactional Resources in Family Discourse.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 37 (4): 399–420. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2010 “Abduction and Identity in Family Interaction: Ventriloquizing as Indirectness.” Journal of Pragmatics 42 (2): 307–316. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tardy, Christine M., and John Swales
2014 “Genre analysis.” In Pragmatics of Discourse, ed. by Klaus P. Schneider and Anne Barron, 165–184. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tereszkiewicz, Anna
2014 “ ‘I’m Not Sure what that means yet, but we’ll Soon Find Out’ – The Discourse of Newspaper Live Blogs.” Studia Linguistica Universitatis Iagellonicae Cracoviensis 131: 299–319. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Thompson, John
1995The Media and Modernity: A Social Theory of the Media. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
Thornborrow, Joanna
2015The Discourse of Public Participation Media: From Talk Show to Twitter. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Thurlow, Crispin, and Kristine Mroczek
(eds) 2011Digital Discourse: Language in the New Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tolson, Andrew
1985 “Anecdotal Television.” Screen 26 (2): 18–27. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1991 “Televised Chat and the Synthetic Personality.” In Broadcast Talk, ed. by Paddy Scannell, 178–200. London: Sage.Google Scholar
2006Media Talk: Spoken Discourse on TV and Radio. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Tsui, Amy B. M.
1994English Conversation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ungerer, Friedrich
2000 “News Stories and News Events. A Changing Relationship.” In English Media Texts Past and Present: Language and Textual Structure, ed. by Friedrich Ungerer, 177–195. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004 “Ads as News Stories, News Stories as Ads: The Interaction of Advertisements and Editorial Texts in Newspapers.” Text 24 (3): 307–328. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ventola, Eija
1999 “Semiotic Spanning at Conferences: Cohesion and Coherence in and Across Conference Papers and their Discussions.” In Coherence in Spoken and Written Discourse: How to Create It and How to Describe It, ed. by Wolfram Bublitz, Uta Lenk, and Eija Ventola, 101–124. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Verschueren, Jef
1999Understanding Pragmatics. London and New York: Arnold.Google Scholar
Walker, Jim
2008 “The Footballer’s Perfect – Are Footballers Leading the Way?” In The Linguistics of Football, ed. by Eva Lavric, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner, and Wolfgang Stadler, 295–303. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.Google Scholar
Weed, Mike
2007 “The Pub as a Virtual Football Fandom Venue: An Alternative to ‘Being There’.” Soccer & Society 8 (2/3): 399–414. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wells, Matt
2011 “How Live Blogging has Transformed Journalism.” The Guardian (online version), 28.3.2011. Available online at http://​www​.guardian​.co​.uk​/media​/2011​/mar​/28​/live​-blogging​-transforms​-journalism​/print (Accessed on 18.22012).Google Scholar
Wenger, Etienne
1998Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Werner, Valentin
2016 “Real-time Online Text Commentaries: A Cross-cultural Perspective.” In Variational Text Linguistics, ed. by Christoph Schubert and Christina Sanchez-Stockhammer, 271–306. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
. Forthc. “A Multimodal Analysis of Football Online Text Commentaries.” In Corpus Approaches to the Language of Sports: Texts, Media, Modalities ed. by Marcus Callies and Magnus Levin. London: Bloomsbury.
Werry, Christopher C.
1996 “Linguistic and Interactional Features of Internet Relay Chat.” In Computer-Mediated Communication: Linguistic, Social, and Cross-Cultural Perspectives, ed. by Susan C. Herring, 47–63. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
White, Peter R. R.
2003News as History: Your Daily Gossip.” In Re/reading the Past. Critical and Functional Perspectives on Time and Value, ed. by John R. Martin and Ruth Wodak, 61–89. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wood, Helen
2009Talking with Television: Women, Talk Shows, and Modern Self-Reflexivity. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
Yus, Francisco
2011Cyberpragmatics: Internet-mediated Communication in Context. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zappavigna, Michele
2012Discourse of Twitter and Social Media: How We Use Language to Create Affiliation on the Web. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2020. Publications Received. Language in Society 49:2  pp. 329 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2021.  In Approaches to Internet Pragmatics [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 318], Crossref logo
Xie, Chaoqun
2020. The pragmatics of internet memes. Internet Pragmatics Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018032914 | Marc record