Studies in Language

Studies in Language (SL) provides a forum for the discussion of issues in contemporary linguistics, with a particular focus on empirically well-grounded research in the functionalist tradition that recognizes the diversity and variability of human languages and of communication patterns, the historical dynamics of languages, and the embedding of language in both social practices and cognition.

Studies in Language provides for three sections and types of contributions:

Regular articles: Regular articles are expected to adopt a cross-linguistic or comparative perspective and to advance our understanding of human language as such, in terms of state-of-the-art theories, methods, and analytical models or frameworks. Regular articles on one individual language are published only to the extent that they make a contribution of general interest.

News from the Field: SL welcomes short contributions that report on new discoveries in little-known or endangered languages, emphasizing description over theory and comparison. Contributions to this special section typically derive from original fieldwork and are expected to provide concise and well-substantiated analyses of linguistic phenomena that have not been noticed so far and for which the wider theoretical implications have yet to be established.

Discussions: SL publishes short position papers that outline or take issue with general visions of the field or address current developments. Contributions to this section may lead to response articles in the same or in a subsequent issue and one (very short) reply by the original contributor.

All submissions are subject to double-blind reviewing.

SL publishes its articles Online First.

Studies in Language introduces a new special section that will appear at irregular intervals:
News from the field: We invite short contributions that report on new discoveries in little-known and/or endangered languages, emphasizing description over theory. Contributions will typically derive from original fieldwork and are expected to provide concise and well-substantiated analyses of linguistic phenomena that have not been noticed much in general or in the relevant family or area, but for which the wider theoretical and comparative implications cannot be established yet. Submissions will be refereed like regular articles.

Studies in Language now offers online submission.

Sample issue: SL 41:1
Board
Managing Editors
Ekkehard König | Free University Berlin/Albert Ludwigs University, Freiburg
Lindsay J. Whaley | Dartmouth College
Review Editor
Martine Robbeets | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena
Editorial Board
Werner Abraham | University of Vienna / University of Munich
Balthasar Bickel | University of Zurich
Greville G. Corbett | University of Surrey
Denis Creissels | Lumière University Lyon 2
N.J. Enfield | University of Sydney
Nicholas Evans | Australian National University
William Foley | University of Sydney
T. Givón | University of Oregon, Eugene
Jeff Good | University of Buffalo
Tom Güldemann | Humboldt University Berlin
Peter Harder | University of Copenhagen
Martin Haspelmath | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Bernd Heine | University of Cologne
Nikolaus P. Himmelmann | University of Cologne
Daniel Hole | University of Stuttgart
Marianne Mithun | University of California, Santa Barbara
Enrique L. Palancar | University of Surrey / CNRS
Doris L. Payne | University of Oregon
Subscription Info
Current issue: 44:2, available as of June 2020

General information about our electronic journals.

Subscription rates

All prices for print + online include postage/handling.

Online-only Print + online
Volume 45 (2021): 4 issues; ca. 1000 pp. EUR 645.00 EUR 748.00
Volume 44 (2020): 4 issues; ca. 1000 pp. EUR 645.00 EUR 748.00

Individuals may apply for a special subscription rate of EUR 95.00 (online‑only: EUR 90.00)
Private subscriptions are for personal use only, and must be pre-paid and ordered directly from the publisher.

Available back-volumes

Online-only Print + online
Complete backset
(Vols. 1‒43; 1977‒2019)
133 issues;
30,200 pp.
EUR 18,250.00 EUR 19,187.00
Volume 43 (2019) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 632.00 EUR 733.00
Volume 42 (2018) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 614.00 EUR 712.00
Volume 41 (2017) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 596.00 EUR 691.00
Volume 40 (2016) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 596.00 EUR 671.00
Volume 39 (2015) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 596.00 EUR 651.00
Volume 38 (2014) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 596.00 EUR 632.00
Volume 37 (2013) 4 issues; 1000 pp. EUR 596.00 EUR 614.00
Volumes 32‒36 (2008‒2012) 4 issues; avg. 1000 pp. EUR 579.00 each EUR 596.00 each
Volume 31 (2007) 4 issues; 900 pp. EUR 562.00 EUR 579.00
Volume 30 (2006) 4 issues; 800 pp. EUR 529.00 EUR 546.00
Volume 29 (2005) 3 issues; 725 pp. EUR 452.00 EUR 513.00
Volumes 20‒28 (1996‒2004) 3 issues; avg. 725 pp. EUR 439.00 each EUR 452.00 each
Volumes 10‒19 (1986‒1995) 2 issues; avg. 520 pp. EUR 316.00 each EUR 325.00 each
Volumes 1‒9 (1977‒1985) 3 issues; avg. 450 pp. EUR 275.00 each EUR 283.00 each
IssuesOnline-first articles

Volume 44 (2020)

Volume 43 (2019)

Volume 42 (2018)

Volume 41 (2017)

Volume 40 (2016)

Volume 39 (2015)

Volume 38 (2014)

Volume 37 (2013)

Volume 36 (2012)

Volume 35 (2011)

Volume 34 (2010)

Volume 33 (2009)

Volume 32 (2008)

Volume 31 (2007)

Volume 30 (2006)

Volume 29 (2005)

Volume 28 (2004)

Volume 27 (2003)

Volume 26 (2002)

Volume 25 (2001)

Volume 24 (2000)

Volume 23 (1999)

Volume 22 (1998)

Volume 21 (1997)

Volume 20 (1996)

Volume 19 (1995)

Volume 18 (1994)

Volume 17 (1993)

Volume 16 (1992)

Volume 15 (1991)

Volume 14 (1990)

Volume 13 (1989)

Volume 12 (1988)

Volume 11 (1987)

Volume 10 (1986)

Volume 9 (1985)

Volume 8 (1984)

Volume 7 (1983)

Volume 6 (1982)

Volume 5 (1981)

Volume 4 (1980)

Volume 3 (1979)

Volume 2 (1978)

Volume 1 (1977)

Latest articles

6 May 2020

  • Plural marking patterns of nouns and their associates in the world’s languages
    Rong Chen | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 231–269
  • Nominal classification: Does it play a role in referent disambiguation?
    Timothy Feist | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 191–230
  • On the polysemy of motion verbs in Ancient Greek and Coptic: Why lexical constructions are important
    Thanasis Georgakopoulos, Eliese-Sophia Lincke, Kiki Nikiforidou & Anna Piata | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 27–69
  • Zero morphemes in paradigms
    Matthias Gerner & Zhang Ling | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 1–26
  • The dual nature of irrealis in complementation
    Axel Holvoet | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 165–190
  • Grammaticalized sources of Kurtöp verbal morphology: On the development of mirativity versus egophoricity in the Himalayas
    Gwendolyn Hyslop | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 132–164
  • Iconicity in syntax and the architecture of linguistic theory
    Diego Gabriel Krivochen & Ľudmila Lacková | SL 44:1 (2020) p. 95
  • Concernee-Concern constructions: A comparative study of external possession in the Bantu languages
    Mark L. O. Van de Velde | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 70–94
  • Zygmunt FrajzyngierErin Shay. 2016. The role of functions in syntax: A unified approach to language theory, description, and typology
    Reviewed by Guangrong Wan & Yuehai Xiao | SL 44:1 (2020) pp. 270–279
  • 23 January 2020

  • Agent demotion through inverted word order: Syntactic passives in Ulwa
    Russell Barlow | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 1015–1037
  • Assertion, presumption and presupposition: An account of the erstwhile nominalizer YUM in Khalkha Mongolian
    Benjamin Brosig, Foong Ha Yap & Kathleen Ahrens | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 896–940
  • Ordering towards disorder: Explaining the stability of non-layered morpheme structure in Athabascan languages
    Lukas Denk | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 800–849
  • The grammaticalisation of verb-auxiliary order in East African Bantu: From information structure to tense-aspect
    Hannah Gibson | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 757–799
  • Clause constituents, arguments and the question of grammatical relations in Auslan (Australian Sign Language): A corpus-based study
    Trevor Alexander Johnston | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 941–996
  • The grammar of ‘non-realization’
    Tania Kuteva, Bas Aarts, Gergana Popova & Anvita Abbi | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 850–895
  • The relative pronoun strategy: New data from southern New Guinea
    Jeff Siegel | SL 43:4 (2019) p. 997
  • Laurel J. Brinton (ed.). 2017. English historical linguistics: Approaches and perspectives
    Reviewed by Pablo M. Tagarro & Nerea Suárez-González | SL 43:4 (2019) pp. 1038–1048
  • 18 November 2019

  • Differential nominal marking in Circassian
    Peter M. Arkadiev & Yakov G. Testelets | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 715–751
  • Must/need, may/can and the scope of the modal auxiliary: May thee know the pitfalls of thy paraphrases!
    Patrick Duffley | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 499–532
  • Expressing possibility in two Oceanic languages
    Kilu von Prince & Anna Margetts | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 628–667
  • Syntactic and semantic agreement in Eegimaa (Banjal): An account of lexical hybrids in an African noun class system
    Serge Sagna | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 585–627
  • The naked truth about the Chamorro dual
    Thomas Stolz | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 533–584
  • The grammatical-lexical distinction in Chinese aspectual markers
    Linlin Sun & Kasper Boye | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 668–714
  • Alexandra Y. AikhenvaldR. M. W. Dixon (eds.). 2017. Commands: a cross-linguistic typology
    Reviewed by Lars Johanson | SL 43:3 (2019) pp. 752–756
  • 13 November 2019

  • Truth, person, and personal truth: Kuke copulas, a construction caught between descriptive systems
    Mark Donohue & Bhojraj Gautam | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 444–458
  • The predicate as a locus of grammar and interaction in colloquial Indonesian
    Michael C. Ewing | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 402–443
  • Free NPs as units in Finnish
    Marja-Liisa Helasvuo | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 301–328
  • Linguistic units and their systems: Completeness, self-reference, and contingency
    Ross Krekoski | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 281–300
  • Questioning the clause as a crosslinguistic unit in grammar and interaction
    Ritva Laury, Tsuyoshi Ono & Ryoko Suzuki | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 364–401
  • Referring expressions in categorizing activities: Rethinking the nature of linguistic units for the study of interaction
    Patricia Mayes & Hongyin Tao | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 329–363
  • Reversed ang-inversion and narrow focus marking in Tagalog
    Patrick Nuhn | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 469–497
  • Understanding ‘clause’ as an emergent ‘unit’ in everyday conversation
    Sandra A. Thompson | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 254–280
  • Oliver Bond, Greville G. Corbett, Marina ChumakinaDunstan Brown (eds.). 2016. Archi. Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective
    Reviewed by Edith A. Moravcsik | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 459–468
  • On the notion of unit in the study of human languages
    Tsuyoshi Ono, Ritva Laury & Ryoko Suzuki | SL 43:2 (2019) pp. 245–253
  • 12 June 2019

  • Two types of morphologically expressed non-verbal predication
    Pier Marco Bertinetto, Luca Ciucci & Margherita Farina | SL 43:1 (2019) pp. 120–194
  • Deconstructing (ir)regularity
    Borja Herce | SL 43:1 (2019) pp. 44–91
  • Linguistic typology, language modality, and stuff like that: A corpus-based study on the general extender zhilei(de) ‘of that kind’ in spoken and written Chinese
    Chen-Yu Chester Hsieh | SL 43:1 (2019) p. 92
  • Criteria for establishing the inventory of semantic participants and voices in Tagalog
    Sergei Klimenko | SL 43:1 (2019) pp. 1–43
  • General converbs in Andi
    Samira Verhees | SL 43:1 (2019) pp. 195–230
  • Martine RobbeetsAlexander Savelyev (eds.). 2018. Language Dispersal Beyond Farming
    Reviewed by Peter Bellwood | SL 43:1 (2019) pp. 231–241
  • List of reviewers 2018
    SL 43:1 (2019) pp. 242–243
  • 4 February 2019

  • From perfect to narrative tense: The development of an evidential meaning examined generally and in the Even language
    Teija Greed | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 923–966
  • Argument realization of psychological verbs
    Chao Li | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 755–797
  • The constructionalization and constructional change of noncanonical V-NP expressions in Mandarin Chinese
    Yanzhi Li & Yicheng Wu | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 886–922
  • Reference tracking in Tima and its interplay with split ergative marking
    Gertrud Schneider-Blum & Birgit Hellwig | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 970–993
  • The typological change of motion expressions in Chinese revisited: Motion events in Old Chinese and its Modern Chinese translation
    Wenlei Shi, Wanglong Yang & Henghua Su | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 847–885
  • Human impersonal pronouns in West Germanic: A questionnaire-based comparative study of Afrikaans, Dutch and English
    Daniël Van Olmen & Adri Breed | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 798–846
  • Gregory Stump. 2016. Inflectional paradigms: Content and form at the syntax-morphology interface
    Reviewed by Natalie Operstein | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 994–998
  • Response: Fleischhauer and Czardybon evade the burden of proof
    Krasimir Kabakčiev | SL 42:4 (2018) pp. 967–969
  • Guidelines

    Studies in Language offers online submission .

    Guidelines for contributors

    General

    Studies in Language invites contributions in all areas of linguistics, with special reference for morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, historical linguistics, and discourse. For all contributions, the priority of a typological and cross-linguistic perspective is high: articles on one language only are welcome if of interest to the generalist/universalist. Likewise, interdisciplinary studies are welcome to the extent that they have the same perspective.

    Article submission

    Preferably, manuscripts should be submitted online. Please consult the Short Guide to EM for Authors before you submit your paper. For specifics such as typing format, illustrations and tables, references, glosses etc. please consult the SL style sheet on this website.

    Book review submission

    Please consult the guidelines for book reviews, and books available for review.

    Editorial policy

    Contributions should be in the English language only. Articles previously published or under consideration by another journal cannot be accepted. All correspondence concerning editorial matters should be sent directly to one of the following editors:

    Ekkehard König   Lindsay J. Whaley
    Managing Editor   Managing Editor
    Freie Universität Berlin   Program in Linguistics
    Institut für Englische Philologie   Dartmouth College
    Habelschwerdter Allee 45   Parkhurst 102
    D-14195 BERLIN   HANOVER, NH 03766
    Germany   USA
    koenig at zedat.fu-berlin.de   lindsay.j.whaley at dartmouth.edu

    Book reviews and proofs

    Martine Robbeets
    Max Planck Institute for the
    Science of Human History
    Kahlaische Strasse 10
    DE-07745 JENA
    Germany
    robbeets at shh.mpg.de

    Subjects

    Main BIC Subject

    CF: Linguistics

    Main BISAC Subject

    LAN009000: LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General