Case, Valency and Transitivity

Editors
| Leiden University
| Radboud University Nijmegen
| Radboud University Nijmegen
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027230874 | EUR 145.00 | USD 218.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027293114 | EUR 145.00 | USD 218.00
 
The three concepts of case, valency and transitivity belong to the most discussed topics of modern linguistics. On the one hand, they are crucially connected with morphological aspects of the clause, including case marking, person agreement and voice. On the other hand, they are related to several semantic issues such as the meaning of case, semantico-syntactic verbal classes, and the semantic correlates of transitivity. The volume unifies papers written within different theoretical frameworks and representing variegated approaches (Optimality Theory, Government and Binding, various versions of the Functional approach, Cross-linguistic and Typological analyses), containing both numerous new findings in individual languages and valuable observations and generalizations related to case, valency and transitivity.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 77]  2006.  xx, 503 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
vii–xix
Part I. Morphological case
1
Syntactic vs. morphological case: Implications for morphosyntax
Andrew Spencer
3–21
Case systems in a diachronic perspective: A typological sketch
Leonid Kulikov
23–47
Emergence of morphological cases in South Mande: From the amorphous type to inflectional?
Valentin Vydrin
49–64
Issues of morphological ergativity in the Tsimshian languages: Agreement, determiners and the reconstruction of case
Tyler Peterson
65–90
Direction marking and case in Menominee
Jochen Trommer
91–111
Part II. Case-marking and transitivity
113
A. Syntax of case
113
Bare and prepositional differential case marking: The exotic case of German (and Icelandic) among all of Germanic
Werner Abraham
115–145
Control infinitives and case in Germanic: ‘Performance error’ or marginally acceptable constructions?
Jóhanna Barðdal and Thórhallur Eythórsson
147–177
Experiencer coding in Nakh-Daghestanian
Dmitry Ganenkov
179–202
‘Argument sharing’ in Oriya serial verb constructions
Kalyanamalini Sahoo
203–221
B. Case interpretation
223
Two approaches to specificity
Lars Johanson
225–247
Case markedness
Peter de Swart
249–267
Incremental distinguishability of subject and object
Helen de Hoop and Monique Lamers
269–287
C. Case and the typology of transitivity
289
The woman showed the baby to her sister: On resolving humanness-driven ambiguity in ditransitives
Seppo Kittilä
291–308
Case semantics and the agent-patient opposition
Åshild Næss
309–327
Transitivity parameters and transitivity alternations: Constraining co-variation
Andrej L. Malchukov
329–357
Transitivity in Songhay
Julia Galiamina
359–371
Part III. Transitivity and valency change
373
Syntactic valence, information structure, and passive constructions in Kaqchikel
George Aaron Broadwell
375–392
A very active passive: Functional similarities between passive and causative in Balkar
Ekaterina Lyutikova and Anastasia Bonch-Osmolovskaya
393–416
Case marking, possession and syntactic hierarchies in Khakas causative constructions in comparison with other Turkic languages
Alexander Letuchiy
417–439
Transitivity increase markers interacting with verbs semantics: Evidence from Finno-Ugric languages
Elena Kalinina, Dmitriy Kolomatskiy and Alexandra Sudobina
441–463
Extraversive transitivization in Yucatec Maya and the nature of the applicative
Christian Lehmann and Elisabeth Verhoeven
465–493
Language Index
495–497
Subject Index
498–503
“The volume ‘Case, Valency and Transitivity’ is a fine collection of papers by authors coming from different countries and belonging to different theoretical frameworks but sharing some fundamental assumptions on what case and transitivity are and how they work, even though these assumptions are often couched in quite different terminology and illustrated by very different data. The book is abundant in very interesting material from a whole array of languages, some of them quite ‘exotic’, and contains valuable contributions to language description, typology, and linguistic theory. The major outcome of this volume, besides the purely empirical one, consists, in my opinion, in clearly showing that the interaction and collaboration of linguists working on different aspects of a single notional domain and approaching it from divergent perspectives may be very fruitful.”
“Ce volume est la meilleure preuve que la typologie est en plein essor depuis quelques annees. En apportant regulierement de nouveaux faits sur des langues peu ou mal etudiees, en proposant des theories explicatives qui suscitent la discussion, ce genre d'ouvrages contribue al'enrichissement de nos connaissances sur les mecanismes qui sont aI'reuvre dans l'expression des fonctions centrales.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Barðdal, Jóhanna
2018.  In Non-Canonically Case-Marked Subjects [Studies in Language Companion Series, 200],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Halevy, Rivka
2020.  In Usage-Based Studies in Modern Hebrew [Studies in Language Companion Series, 210],  pp. 465 ff. Crossref logo
Kuteva, Tania, Bernd Heine, Bo Hong, Haiping Long, Heiko Narrog & Seongha Rhee
2019.  In World Lexicon of Grammaticalization, Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 august 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2006040572