Relative Clauses in Languages of the Americas

A typological overview

Editors
| Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
| University of Sonora
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206831 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027273390 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Patterns of relative clause formation tend to vary according to the typological properties of a language. Highly polysynthetic languages tend to have fully nominalized relative clauses and no relative pronouns, while other typologically diverse languages tend to have relative clauses which are similar to main or independent clauses. Languages of the Americas, with their rich genetic diversity, have all been under the influence of European languages, whether Spanish, English or Portuguese, a situation that may be expected to have influenced their grammatical patterns. The present volume focuses on two tasks: The first deals with the discussion of functional principles related to relative clause formation: diachrony and paths of grammaticalization, simplicity vs. complexity, and formalization of rules to capture semantic-syntactic correlations. The second provides a typological overview of relative clauses in nine different languages going from north to south in the Americas.
[Typological Studies in Language, 102]  2012.  xiii, 307 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
map
vii–viii
Introduction
Bernard Comrie and Zarina Estrada-Fernández
ix–xiv
part i. Diachrony, typology, and theory
Toward a diachronic typology of relative clause
T. Givón
1–26
The evolution of language and elaborateness of grammar: The case of relative clauses in creole languages
Tania Kuteva and Bernard Comrie
27–46
Some issues in the linking between syntax and semantics in relative clauses
Robert D. Van Valin Jr.
47–64
Part II. Uto-Aztecan
Relative clauses and nominalizations in Yaqui
Albert Álvarez González
65–96
On relative clauses and related constructions in Yaqui
Lilián Guerrero
97–126
From demonstrative to relative marker to clause linker: Relative clause formation in Pima Bajo
Zarina Estrada-Fernández
127–146
Functional underpinnings of diachrony in relative clause formation: The nominalization-relativization connection in Northern Paiute
Tim Thornes
147–170
Part III. Elsewhere in the Americas
Clauses as noun modifiers in Toba (Guaycuruan)
María Belén Carpio and Marisa Censabella
171–190
Between headed and headless relative clauses
Patience Epps
191–212
Relative clauses in Seri
Stephen A. Marlett
213–242
Relative clauses in Gavião of Rondônia
Denny Moore
243–252
Relative clauses in Yucatec Maya: Light heads vs. Null domain
Rodrigo Gutièrrez-Bravo
253–268
Questionable relatives
Marianne Mithun
269–300
Language and language family index
301–302
Name index
303–304
Subject index
305–308
“This book is undoubtedly a welcome and significant contribution to the field of relative clauses focusing on indigenous languages in the Americas. The cross-linguistic coverage of the volume provides valuable and first-hand data for typological studies as well as for the knowledge of relative clauses of each language discussed in it.”
“This is a very useful volume, with chapters from diverse theoretical perspectives that are especially notable for their wealth of data, detailed and rigorous analyses, and careful attention to the typological implications of the materials.”
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Cited by other publications

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2019.  In Diverse Scenarios of Syntactic Complexity [Typological Studies in Language, 126],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Chamoreau, Claudine & Zarina Estrada-Fernández
2016.  In Finiteness and Nominalization [Typological Studies in Language, 113],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Green, Clarence
2014. On the relationship between clause combination, grammatical hierarchy and discourse-pragmatic coherence. Functions of Language 21:3  pp. 297 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 30 january 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2012022781