Language Typology and Historical Contingency

In honor of Johanna Nichols

Editors
| University of Zurich
| University of Chicago
| Dartmouth College
| University of California, Berkeley and Columbia University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206855 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270801 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
What is the range of diversity in linguistic types, what are the geographical distributions for the attested types, and what explanations, based on shared history or universals, can account for these distributions? This collection of articles by prominent scholars in typology seeks to address these issues from a wide range of theoretical perspectives, utilizing cutting-edge typological methodology. The phenomena considered range from the phonological to the morphosyntactic, the areal coverage ranges in scale from micro-areal to worldwide, and the types of historical contingency range from contact-based to genealogical in nature. Together, the papers argue strongly for a view in which, although they use distinct methodologies, linguistic typology and historical linguistics are one and the same enterprise directed at discovering how languages came to be the way they are and how linguistic types came to be distributed geographically as they are.
[Typological Studies in Language, 104]  2013.  viii, 512 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
vii–viii
Part I. Structures and typologies
Discourse semantics and the form of the verb predicate in Karachay-Balkar: A corpus-based and experimental study
Andrej A. Kibrik
3–46
Typology and channel of communication: Where do signed languages fit in
Dan I. Slobin
47–68
Marking versus indexing: Revisiting the Nichols marking-locus typology
Nicholas Evans and Eva Fenwick
69–90
Head-marking languages and linguistic theory
Robert D. Van Valin Jr.
91–124
Lessons of variability in clause coordination: Evidence from North Caucasian languages
Aleksandr E. Kibrik
125–152
Noun classes grow on trees: Noun classification in the North-East Caucasus
Keith Plaster, Maria Polinsky and Boris Harizanov
153–170
Affecting valence in Khumi
David A. Peterson
171–194
Capturing diversity in language acquisition research
Sabine Stoll and Balthasar Bickel
195–216
Part II. Distributions in time and space
Who inherits what, when?: Toward a theory of contact, substrates, and superimposition zones
Mark Donohue
219–240
Polysynthesis in the Arctic/Sub-Arctic: How recent is it?
Michael Fortescue
241–264
A (micro-)accretion zone in a remnant zone?: Lower Fungom in areal-historical perspective
Jeff Good
265–282
A history of Iroquoian gender marking
Michael Cysouw
283–298
The satem shift, Armenian siseṙn, and the early Indo-European of the Balkans
Bill J. Darden
299–308
Penultimate lengthening in Bantu: Analysis and spread
Larry M. Hyman
309–330
Culture and the spread of Slavic
Alan Timberlake
331–356
The syntax and pragmatics of Tungusic revisited
Lenore A. Grenoble
357–382
Some observations on typological features of hunter-gatherer languages
Michael Cysouw and Bernard Comrie
383–394
Typologizing phonetic precursors to sound change
Alan C.L. Yu
395–414
Distributional biases in language families
Balthasar Bickel
415–444
The morphology of imperatives in Lak: Stem vowels in the second singular simplex transitive affirmative
Victor A. Friedman
445–462
Subgrouping in Tibeto-Burman: Can an individual-identifying standard be developed? How do we factor in the history of migrations and language contact?
Randy J. LaPolla
463–474
Part III. A (cautionary) note on methodology
Real data, contrived data, and the Yokuts Canon
William F. Weigel
477–494
Language index
495–498
Name index
499–504
Subject index
505–512
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Everett, Caleb
2017. Languages in Drier Climates Use Fewer Vowels. Frontiers in Psychology 8 Crossref logo
Sinnemäki, Kaius
2014. Cognitive processing, language typology, and variation. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science 5:4  pp. 477 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2013038029 | Marc record