Interpreting

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Editors
| Georgetown University
| Georgetown University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027231796 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027285997 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
This volume is concerned with the profession and discipline of interpretation. The range of perspectives presented in this collection of essays exemplifies the rich diversity of the profession as we know it today. Interpreting has been known to exist through the ages, though it was not necessarily considered a profession as such. We can attribute the current standing of the practice, in large part, to the historical circumstances which determined it and the efforts of those who responded to the need for communication within these circumstances. In the same way, our anticipation of future needs and the measures we are taking to prepare our next generation of interpreters to meet them will undoubtedly shape the direction our profession takes in the 21st century. The contributors to this volume are practicing interpreters, teachers of interpretation, and administrators.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Editor’s remarks
1
Section I: The history of interpreting
Summary history of language services in the U.S. department of state
Harry Obst and Ruth Harwood Cline
8
Working conditions at the Nuremberg Trials
William Skinner and Thomas F. Carson
14
The life of a diplomatic interpreter: An interview with Irena Dobosz
David Bowen, Margareta Bowen and Irena Dobosz
23
History and role of interpreting in africa
Anna Niang
34
Diplomatic interpeting in Czechoslovakia
Hana Kučerová
34
Section II: Interpreter training
The sense of situation in conference interpeting
Christopher Thiéry
40
The importance of sight translation in an interpreter training program
Wilhelm K. Weber
44
The role of cognitive complements in interpreting
Marianne Lederer
53
Curriculum Review at the ISIT (Mexico City)
Raquel Dubrovsky and Georganne Weller
61
Secion III: Court interpreting
Development of legal interpreter education in New Jersey
Roda P. Roberts and Marilyn Tayler
70
How american court view defendants’ rights to interpreters
Ronald C. Chapman
81
The challenge for the court interpreter in Southern Florida
Elena M. de Jongh
91
The intricate Witness-interpreter relationship
W. Brian Altano
96
Interpretation at the Demjanjuk Trial
Ruth Morris
101
Court interpreting in a multiracial society — the malaysian experience
Wong Fook Khoon
108
Section IV: Community interpreting
Interpreting in multicultural settings
Ruth Levy-Berlowitz
117
Interpreters and social workers: contemporary Professional challenges
Francis Turner
122
Community interpreting in the curriculum
Monika Gehrke
131
Consecutive note-taking for community interpretation
Nancy Schweda Nicholson
136
Community interpreting in Australia
Patrizia Burley
146
Section V: Future Developments
Some thoughts on the evaluation of simultaneous interpretation
Karla Déjean Le Féal
154
Should conference interpreters specialize?
Erich Feldweg
161
Overcoming language barriers in european television
Ingrid Kurz
168
Contributors
176
Call for proposals
178
Corporate members
179
Institutional members
182
American translators association officers and board of directors
184
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
1995. Stranger in Paradigms: What Lies Ahead for Simultaneous Interpreting Research?. Target 7:1  pp. 7 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111], Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 9 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 15 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 57 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 133 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 165 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 211 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 247 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 255 ff. Crossref logo
No author info given
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 265 ff. Crossref logo
Mikkelson, Holly & Barry Slaughter Olsen
2014.  In From Paris to Nuremberg [Benjamins Translation Library, 111],  pp. 5 ff. Crossref logo
Moeketsi, R H
2001. In Court with Dell Hymes: Implications for Courtroom Discourse and Court Interpreting. South African Journal of African Languages 21:2  pp. 133 ff. Crossref logo
Pöchhacker, Franz, Holly Mikkelson, Miriam Shlesinger, Monique Caminade, Roger Ellis, David Pattinson & Anthony Pym
1997. Book Reviews. The Translator 3:1  pp. 81 ff. Crossref logo
Tobia, Simona
2010. Crime and Judgement. The Translator 16:2  pp. 275 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting