Identity and Status in the Translational Professions

Editors
| Tel Aviv University
| Bar Ilan University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027202512 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027285010 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This volume contributes to the emerging research on the social formation of translators and interpreters as specific occupational groups. Despite the rising academic interest in sociological perspectives in Translation Studies, relatively little research has so far been devoted to translators’ social background, status struggles and sense of self. The articles assembled here zoom in on the “groups of individuals” who perform the complex translating and/or interpreting tasks, thereby creating their own space of cultural production. Cutting across varied translatorial and geographical arenas, they reflect a view of the interrelatedness between the macro-level question of professional status and micro-level aspects of practitioners’ identity. Addressing central theoretical issues relating to translators’ habitus and role perception, as well as methodological challenges of using qualitative and quantitative measures, this endeavor also contributes to the critical discourse on translators’ agency and ethics and to questions of reformulating their social role.The contributions to this volume were originally published in Translation and Interpreting Studies 4:2 (2009) and 5:1 (2010).
[Benjamins Current Topics, 32]  2011.  xiii, 282 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
vii–xiv
Introduction
1–10
Legal and translational occupations in Spain: Regulation and specialization in jurisdictional struggles
Esther Monzó-Nebot
11–30
Effectiveness of translator certification as a signaling device: Views from the translator recruiters
Andy Lung Jan Chan
31–48
Conference interpreting: Surveying the profession
Franz Pöchhacker
49–64
Occupation or profession: A survey of the translators' world
David Katan
65–88
Attitudes to role, status and professional identity in interpreters and translators with Chinese in Shanghai and Taipei
Robin Setton and Alice Guo Liangliang
89–118
Conference interpreters and their self-representation: A worldwide webbased survey
Cornelia Zwischenberger
119–134
Habitus and self-image of native literary author-translators in diglossic societies
Reine Meylaerts
135–154
The people behind the words: Professional profiles and activity patterns of translators of Arabic literature into Hebrew (1896–2009)
Hannah Amit-Kochavi
155–172
Revised translations, revised identities: (Auto)biographical contextualization of translation
Elena Baibikov
173–188
Conference interpreters and their perception of culture: From the narratives of Japanese pioneers
Kumiko Torikai
189–208
Images of the court interpreter: Professional identity, role definition and self-image
Ruth Morris
209–230
A professional ideology in the making: Bilingual youngsters interpreting for their communities and the notion of (no) choice
Claudia V. Angelelli
231–246
"Boundary work" as a concept for studying professionalization processes in the interpreting field
Nadja Grbić
247–262
The task of the interpreter in the struggle of the other for empowerment: Mythical utopia or sine qua non of professionalism?
Şebnem Bahadır
263–278
Index
279–282
“The contributions in this carefully edited and eminently readable volume

(with an excellent and useful index) present a wealth of empirical

material as well as a great deal of stimulating conceptual work. The

volume is indispensable

reading for Translation Studies scholars interested in the sociology of

professions and it offers a number of insights with respect to the

sociology of translation in general. It is, moreover, highly recommended

to anyone trying to keep up with

the not-so-mechanic mechanisms and driving forces underlying

differentiation processes within our field of study and the “effets de

théorie” (Bourdieu 1981) informing them.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Angelelli, Claudia V.
2018.  In The Palgrave Handbook of Applied Linguistics Research Methodology,  pp. 761 ff. Crossref logo
Bednárová-Gibová, Klaudia & Branislav Madoš
2019. Investigating Translators’ Work-related Happiness: Slovak Sworn and Institutional Translators as a Case in Point. Meta: Journal des traducteurs 64:1  pp. 215 ff. Crossref logo
Davier, Lucile
2019. Non-literary translation in Switzerland. Translation Spaces 8:2  pp. 257 ff. Crossref logo
Hlavac, Jim
2017. Brokers, dual-role mediators and professional interpreters: a discourse-based examination of mediated speech and the roles that linguistic mediators enact. The Translator 23:2  pp. 197 ff. Crossref logo
Hoyte-West, Antony
2020. The professional status of conference interpreters in the Republic of Ireland: An exploratory study. Translation Studies  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Im, Sei-inn & Hyang-Ok Lim
2019. Where do we stand?. FORUM 17:2  pp. 192 ff. Crossref logo
Kafi, Mohsen, Masood Khoshsaligheh & Mohammad Reza Hashemi
2018. Translation profession in Iran: current challenges and future prospects. The Translator 24:1  pp. 89 ff. Crossref logo
Martín Ruano, M. Rosario
2015. (Trans)formative theorising in legal translation and/or interpreting: a critical approach to deontological principles. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 9:2  pp. 141 ff. Crossref logo
Risku, Hanna, Regina Rogl & Jelena Milosevic
2017. Translation practice in the field. Translation Spaces 6:1  pp. 3 ff. Crossref logo
Risku, Hanna, Regina Rogl & Jelena Milosevic
2019.  In Translation Practice in the Field [Benjamins Current Topics, 105],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Roig-Sanz, Diana & Reine Meylaerts
2018.  In Literary Translation and Cultural Mediators in 'Peripheral' Cultures,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Sapiro, Gisèle
2016. Translation and Identity: Social Trajectories of the Translators of Hebrew Literature in French1. TTR 26:2  pp. 59 ff. Crossref logo
Tyulenev, Sergey
2015. Towards theorising translation as an occupation. Asia Pacific Translation and Intercultural Studies 2:1  pp. 15 ff. Crossref logo
Tyulenev, Sergey, Binghan Zheng & Penelope Johnson
2017. A comparative study of translation or interpreting as a profession in Russia, China and Spain. Translation and Interpreting Studies 12:2  pp. 332 ff. Crossref logo
Villanueva Jordán, Iván, Fiorella Hermoza Vega & Monica Bravo Diaz
2017. Experiencias profesionales y percepciones sobre la subtitulación interlingüística en Lima, Perú. Mutatis Mutandis. Revista Latinoamericana de Traducción 10:2  pp. 123 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011026796