Education in Languages of Lesser Power

Asia-Pacific Perspectives

Editors
| Divine Word University, Papua New Guinea
| Kansai University, Japan
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027218766 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269584 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
The cultural diversity of the Asia-Pacific region is reflected in a multitude of linguistic ecologies of languages of lesser power, i.e., of indigenous and immigrant languages whose speakers lack collective linguistic power, especially in education. This volume looks at a representative sampling of such communities. Some receive strong government support, while others receive none. For some indigenous languages, the same government schools that once tried to stamp out indigenous languages are now the vehicles of language revival. As the various chapters in this book show, some parents strongly support the use of languages other than the national language in education, while others are actively against it, and perhaps a majority have ambivalent feelings. The overall meta-theme that emerges from the collection is the need to view the teaching and learning of these languages in relation to the different needs of the speakers within a sociolinguistics of mobility.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Dedication
v–vi
Preface
xi–xii
Foreword
Nicholas Ostler
xiii–xvi
Introduction
The diversity of Asia-Pacific language ecologies
Craig Alan Volker
1–11
Education, power and sociolinguistic mobility
Fred E. Anderson
13–29
East Asia
A Yami language teacher’s journey in Taiwan
D. Victoria Rau
33–48
Power and other issues in minority language education in China: The case of Bai in Northwestern Yunnan
Picus Sizhi Ding
49–64
Forming a Korean identity in Japan: The role of a North Korea-affiliated school in the identity formation of three members of one family
Mary Goebel Noguchi
65–87
Southeast Asia
Patani Malay in Thai education
Suwilai Premsrirat
91–110
Language in schooling in Timor-Leste
Marie Quinn
111–130
Bidayuh as a subject at pre-school and primary levels: Moves towards a greater role for a Borneo indigenous language in the Malaysian education system
James McLellan and Yvonne M Campbell
131–151
Sustaining and maintaining a minority language: A case study of the place and use of Tamil in Singapore
Chitra Shegar and Saravaran Gopinathan
153–172
Oceania
UNESCO’s action in culture and the importance of language maintenance in the Pacific
Akatsuki Takahashi
175–184
State versus community approaches to language revival: The case of Wirangu at the Scotdesco community (South Australia)
Paul Monaghan and Peter Mühlhäusler
185–203
Vernacular education in Papua New Guinea: Reform or deform?
Craig Alan Volker
205–221
From despised jargon to language of education: Recent developments in the teaching of Norf'k (Norfolk Island, South Pacific)
Peter Mühlhäusler
223–241
Te Reo Māori – He Reo Kura? (Māori Language – A School Language?)
Margie Kahukura Hōhepa
243–260
A study of bilingual education using Samoan language in New Zealand
Meaola Amituanai-Toloa
261–287
Index
293–300
Authors
289–292
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFB – Sociolinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014022643 | Marc record