From Polysemy to Semantic Change

Towards a typology of lexical semantic associations

Editor
| Llacan (Inalco, CNRS), Fédération TUL
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205735 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027290328 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
This book is the result of a joint project on lexical and semantic typology which gathered together field linguists, semanticists, cognitivists, typologists, and an NLP specialist. These cross-linguistic studies concern semantic shifts at large, both synchronic and diachronic: the outcome of polysemy, heterosemy, or semantic change at the lexical level. The first part presents a comprehensive state of the art of a domain typologists have long been reluctant to deal with. Part two focuses on theoretical and methodological approaches: cognition, construction grammar, graph theory, semantic maps, and data bases. These studies deal with universals and variation across languages, illustrated with numerous examples from different semantic domains and different languages. Part three is dedicated to detailed empirical studies of a large sample of languages in a limited set of semantic fields. It reveals possible universals of semantic association, as well as areal and cultural tendencies.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 106]  2008.  xiii, 404 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Semantic associations: A foreword
Martine Vanhove
vii–xiii
Part 1. State of the art
Approaching lexical typology
Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm
3–52
Part 2. Theoretical and methodological issues
Words and their meanings: Principles of variation and stabilization
Stéphane Robert
55–92
The typology of semantic affinities
Bernard Pottier
93–105
Cognitive onomasiology and lexical change: Around the eye
Peter Koch †
107–137
Mapping semantic spaces: A constructionist account of the "light verb" xordæn 'eat' in Persian
Niloufar Family
139–161
Semantic maps and the typology of colexification: Intertwining polysemous networks across languages
Alexandre François
163–215
A catalogue of semantic shifts: Towards a typology of semantic derivation
Anna A. Zalizniak
217–232
Semantic associations and confluences in paradigmatic networks
Bruno Gaume, Karine Duvignau and Martine Vanhove
233–264
Part 3. Case studies
About 'Eating' in a few Niger-Congo languages
Emilio Bonvini
267–289
Eating beyond certainties
Christine Hénault
291–301
From semantic change to polysemy: The cases of 'meat/animal' and 'drink'
Pascal Boyeldieu
303–315
Is a 'friend' an 'enemy'? Between "proximity" and "opposition"
Sergueï Sakhno and Nicole Tersis
317–339
Semantic associations between sensory modalities, prehension and mental perceptions: A crosslinguistic perspective
Martine Vanhove
341–370
Cats and bugs: Some remarks about semantic parallelisms
Michel Masson
371–386
General index
387–395
Index of languages
397–400
Index of names
401–404
“Overall, the book offers an up to date overview of a branch of linguistics that has always served as a testing ground for many linguistic theories. [...] the case studies closing the book constitute an invaluable resource for cognitive linguists, especially for the investigation of the universality and culture-specificity of metaphor and metonymy. All the articles demonstrate how typology, diachrony and cognitive linguistics intertwine in the study of polysemy.”
“This edited volume is a fine reader for those who are interested in applied linguistics and especially in language teaching and acquisition. The conclusions of the various analyses reveal it is possible to distinguish common features in semantic shifts in very diverse languages, from Indo-European languages to Sino-Tibetan languages, from African languages to Finno-Ugric, etc. The universal mechanisms underlying semantic change may be a helpful starting point for developing a method to improve lexical competence.”
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2008031821 | Marc record