Paradigm Change

In the Transeurasian languages and beyond

Editors
| Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz
| Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027259264 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269737 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book is concerned with comparing morphological paradigms between languages in order to establish areal and genealogical relationships. The languages in focus are the Transeurasian languages: Japanese, Korean, Tungusic, Mongolic, and Turkic languages. World-eminent experts in diachronic morphology and typology interact with specialists on Transeurasian languages, presenting innovative theoretical analyses and new empirical facts. The stress on the importance of paradigmatic morphology in historical linguistics contrasts sharply with the paucity of existing literature on the topic. This volume partially fills this gap, by shifting focus from Indo-European to other language families. “Paradigm change” will appeal to scholars and advanced students concerned with linguistic reconstruction, language contact, morphology and typology, and to anyone interested in the Transeurasian languages.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 161]  2014.  xix, 345 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of tables
ix–xiv
List of figures
xv–xvi
List of contributors
xvii–xviii
Acknowledgements
xix–xx
Chapter 1. When paradigms change
Martine Robbeets and Walter Bisang
1–20
Part I. Paradigm change
Chapter 2. On the strength of morphological paradigms: A historical account of radical pro-drop
Walter Bisang
23–60
Chapter 3. Derivational paradigms in diachrony 
and comparison
Johanna Nichols
61–88
Chapter 4. On arguing from diachrony for paradigms
Brian D. Joseph
89–102
Chapter 5. Reconstructing the Niger-Congo Verb Extension Paradigm: What’s Cognate, Copied or Renewed?
Larry M. Hyman
103–126
Part II. The continuation of paradigms
Chapter 6. Perceived formal and functional equivalence: The Hungarian ik-conjugation
Éva Ágnes Csató
129–140
Chapter 7. Comparative consequences of the tongue root harmony analysis for proto-Tungusic, proto-Mongolic, and proto-Korean
Seongyeon Ko, Andrew Joseph and John Whitman
141–176
Chapter 8. Old Japanese bigrade paradigms and Korean passives and causatives
J. Marshall Unger
177–196
Chapter 9. The Japanese inflectional paradigm in a Transeurasian perspective
Martine Robbeets
197–232
Part III. The innovation of paradigms
Chapter 10. A Yakut copy of a Tungusic viewpoint 
aspect paradigm
Lars Johanson
235–242
Chapter 11. Amdo Altaic directives and comparatives based on the verb ‘to see’
Hans Nugteren
243–256
Chapter 12. Innovations and archaisms in Siberian Turkic spatial case paradigms: A Transeurasian historical and areal perspective
Irina Nevskaya
257–286
Chapter 13. Paradigm copying in Tungusic: The Lamunkhin dialect of Ėven and beyond
Brigitte Pakendorf
287–310
Chapter 14. Ural-Altaic: The Polygenetic Origins of Nominal Morphology 
in the Transeurasian Zone
Juha A. Janhunen
311–336
Language index
337–342
Subject index
343–346
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014020748