Variations on Polysynthesis

The Eskaleut languages

Editors
| University Paris 3 - Sorbonne Nouvelle
| CNRS-CELIA
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206671 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027289377 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
This work is comprised of a set of papers focussing on the extreme polysynthetic nature of the Eskaleut languages which are spoken over the vast area stretching from Far Eastern Siberia, on through the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, and Canada, as far as Greenland. The aim of the book is to situate the Eskaleut languages typologically in general linguistic terms, particularly with regard to polysynthesis. The degree of variation from more to less polysynthesis is evaluated within Eskaleut (Inuit-Yupik vs. Aleut), even in previously insufficiently explored domains such as pragmatics and use in context – including language contact and learning situations – and over typologically related language families such as Athabascan, Chukotko-Kamchatkan, Iroquoian, Uralic, and Wakashan.
[Typological Studies in Language, 86]  2009.  ix, 312 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
vi–vii
Part I. Polysynthesis
Polysynthesis in the Arctic
Marianne Mithun
3–17
Polysynthesis as a typological feature: An attempt at a characterization from Eskimo and Athabaskan perspectives
Willem J. de Reuse
19–34
Analytic vs. synthetic verbal constructions in Chukchi and West Greenlandic
Michael Fortescue
35–49
Lexical polysynthesis: Should we treat lexical bases and their affixes as a continuum?
Nicole Tersis
51–64
How synchronic is synchronic analysis?: Siberian Yupik agglutinative morphology and language history
Nikolai Vakhtin
65–80
Comparative constructions in Central Alaskan Yupik
Osahito Miyaoka
81–94
Part II. Around the verb
The efficacy of anaphoricity in Aleut
Jerrold M. Sadock
97–114
Objective conjugations in Eskaleut and Uralic: Evidence from Inuit and Mansi
Marc-Antoine Mahieu
115–134
Complex verb formation revisited: Restructuring in Inuktitut and Nuu-chah-nulth
Christine M. Pittman
135–147
Determining the semantics of Inuktitut postbases
Conor Cook and Alana Johns
149–170
The marking of past time in Kalaallisut, the Greenlandic language
Naja Frederikke Trondhjem
171–182
Part III. Discourses and contacts
Tracking topics: A comparison of topic in Aleut and Greenlandic discourse
Anna Berge
185–200
Arguments and information management in Inuktitut
Elke Nowak
201–214
Space and structure in Greenlandic oral tradition
Arnaq Grove
215–230
Grammatical structures in Greenlandic as found in texts written by young Greenlanders at the turn of the millennium
Karen Langgård
231–247
Chat – New rooms for language contact
Birgitte Jacobsen
249–260
Seward Peninsula Inupiaq and language contact around Bering Strait
Lawrence D. Kaplan
261–272
Typological constraints on code mixing in Inuktitut–English bilingual adults
Shanley E.M. Allen, Fred Genesee, Sarah Fish and Martha Crago
273–306
Index of languages
307–308
Index of subjects
309–312
“Variations on Polysynthesis is a great thought-provoking book.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Johns, Alana
2010. Eskimo-Aleut Languages. Language and Linguistics Compass 4:10  pp. 1041 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 august 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2008050995