New Directions in Colour Studies

Editors
| University of Glasgow
| University of Glasgow
| University of Glasgow
| University of Glasgow
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027211880 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027284853 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 

Colour studies attracts an increasingly wide range of scholars from across the academic world. Contributions to the present volume offer a broad perspective on the field, ranging from studies of individual languages through papers on art, architecture and heraldry to psychological examinations of aspects of colour categorization, perception and preference. The chapters have been developed from papers and posters presented at a conference on Progress in Colour Studies (PICS08) held at the University of Glasgow. The volume both updates research reported at the earlier PICS04 conference (published by Benjamins in 2006 as Progress in Colour Studies volumes 1 and 2), and introduces new and exciting topics and developments in colour research. In order to make the articles maximally accessible to a multidisciplinary readership, each of the six sections following the initial theoretical papers begins with a short preface describing and drawing together the themes of the chapters within that section. There are seventeen colour illustrations.

[Not in series, 167]  2011.  xii, 462 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
ix–x
Abbreviations
xi–xii
Section 1. Theoretical issues
Illusions of colour and shadow
Frederick A.A. Kingdom
3–12
Universal trends and specific deviations: Multidimensional scaling of colour terms from the World Color Survey
David Bimler
13–26
Touchy-Feely colour
Mazviita Chirimuuta
27–38
Towards a semiotic theory of basic colour terms and the semiotics of Juri Lotman
Urmas Sutrop
39–48
Section 2. Languages of the world
Preface to Section 2
51–52
Basic colour terms of Arabic
Abdulrahman S. Al-Rasheed, Humood H. Al-Sharif, Mohammed J. Thabit, Norah S. Al-Mohimeed and Ian R.L. Davies
53–58
Red herrings in a sea of data: Exploring colour terms with the SCOTS Corpus
Wendy Anderson
59–72
Towards a diachrony of Maltese basic colour terms
Alexander Borg
73–90
Rosa Schätze – Pink zum kaufen: Stylistic confusion, subjective perception and semantic uncertainty of a loaned colour term
Claudia Frenzel-Biamonti
91–104
Kashubian colour vocabulary
Danuta Stanulewicz and Adam Pawłowski
105–120
Colour terms: Evolution via expansion of taxonomic constraints
Ekaterina V. Rakhilina and Galina V. Paramei
121–132
Preliminary research on Turkish basic colour terms with an emphasis on blue
Kaidi Rätsep
133–146
Terms for red in Central Europe: An areal phenomenon in Hungarian and Czech
Mari Uusküla
147–156
Section 3. Colour in society
Preface to Section 3
159–160
Colours in the community: Surnames and bynames in Scottish society
Ellen Bramwell
161–170
Hues and cries: Francis Bacon’s use of colour
Nicholas Chare
171–180
Colour appearance in urban chromatic studies
Michel Cler
181–190
Aspects of armorial colours and their perception in medieval literature
Michael J. Huxtable
191–204
Warm, cool, light, dark, or afterimage: Dimensions and connotations of conceptual color metaphor/metonym
Jodi L. Sandford
205–218
The power of colour term precision: The use of non-basic colour terms 
in nineteenth-century English travelogues 
about northern Scandinavia
Anders Steinvall
219–232
Section 4. Categorical perception of colour
Preface to Section 4
235–236
Investigating the underlying mechanisms of categorical perception of colour using the event-related potential technique
Alexandra Clifford, Anna Franklin, Amanda Holmes and Ian R.L. Davies
237–250
Category training affects colour discrimination but only in the right visual field
Gilda V. Drivonikou, Alexandra Clifford, Anna Franklin, Emre Özgen and Ian R.L. Davies
251–264
Effects of stimulus range on color categorization
Oliver Wright
265–276
Section 5. Individual differences in colour vision
Preface to Section 5
279–280
Colour and autism spectrum disorders
Anna Franklin and Paul T. Sowden
281–292
Red-Green dichromats’ use of basic 
colour terms
Julio Lillo, Humberto Moreira and Ian R.L. Davies
293–308
Synaesthesia in colour
Julia Simner
309–318
Towards a phonetically-rich account 
of speech-sound → colour synaesthesia
Rachel Smith, Anja Moos, William Cartwright-Hignett and David R. Simmons
319–328
Perceiving “grue”: Filter simulations of aged lenses support 
the Lens-Brunescence hypothesis and reveal individual categorization types
Sebastian Walter
329–342
Section 6. Colour preference and colour meaning
Preface to Section 6
345–346
Age-dependence of colour preference in the U.K. population
Zhu Ling and Anya Hurlbert
347–360
Ecological valence and human color preference
Stephen E. Palmer and Karen B. Schloss
361–376
Look and learn: Links between colour preference and colour cognition
Nicola Pitchford, Emma E. Davis and Gaia Scerif
377–388
Effects of lightness and saturation on color associations in the Mexican population
Lilia R. Prado-León and Rosa Amelia Rosales-Cinco
389–394
Colour and emotion
David R. Simmons
395–414
Colors and color adjectives in the cortex
Alessio Plebe, Marco Mazzone and Vivian De la Cruz
415–428
Section 7. Colour vision science
Preface to Section 7
431–432
Chromatic perceptual learning
Paul T. Sowden, Ian R.L. Davies, Leslie A. Notman, Iona Alexander and Emre Özgen
433–444
Unique hues: Perception and brain imaging
Sophie Wuerger and Laura Parkes
445–456
A short note on visual balance judgements as a tool for colour appearance matching
Lucia R. Ronchi
457–458
Index
459–462
“An excellent balance has been struck between high quality scholarship and accessibility, and as a result the book would be of use to beginners and experts from across a whole range of disciplines. Though the reader may approach this book with only a handful of articles in mind, which relate directly to area of research, if they delve a little deeper, they will find topics which can illuminate new approaches and methodologies which they may not have previously considered. And therein lies the success of New Directions in Colour Studies: though spanning an exceptionally wide range of topics, it does so in true interdisciplinary spirit.”
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2014.  In Colour Studies,  pp. ix ff. Crossref logo
Alexander, Marc & Christian Kay
2014.  In Colour Studies,  pp. 126 ff. Crossref logo
Bimler, David, Jennifer Brunt, Laura Lanning & Valérie Bonnardel
2014.  In Colour Studies,  pp. 240 ff. Crossref logo
Charitonidis, Chariton
2014. Colour verbs in Modern Greek: A cognitive approach. Word Structure 7:2  pp. 125 ff. Crossref logo
Chirimuuta, Mazviita
2014.  In Colour Studies,  pp. 273 ff. Crossref logo
De Knop, Sabine
2014.  In Multilingual Cognition and Language Use [Human Cognitive Processing, 44],  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
Gouaich, Yacine, Abdelkader Mebrouki, Racha Ghariri, Abdelkhaliq Mebarki, Akila Belabbas, Banu Manav, Juan Serra, Jorge Llopis & Ana Torres
2018. A novel method for assessing the chromatic integration of architecture in theKsourianlandscape of M'zab Valley, Algeria. Color Research & Application 43:5  pp. 760 ff. Crossref logo
Ocelák, Radek
2016. “Categorical Perception” and Linguistic Categorization of Color. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7:1  pp. 55 ff. Crossref logo
Raffaelli, Ida, Daniela Katunar & Barbara Kerovec
2019.  In Lexicalization patterns in color naming [Studies in Functional and Structural Linguistics, 78],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Stanulewicz, Danuta & Adam Pawłowski
2018.  In Progress in Colour Studies,  pp. 241 ff. Crossref logo
Uusküla, Mari
2014.  In Colour Studies,  pp. 67 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 26 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011027680