(Im)politeness and Moral Order in Online Interactions

Editor
| Fujian Normal University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205629 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261106 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
(Im)politeness and Moral Order in Online Interactions presents a timely response to the ‘moral turn’ in (im)politeness studies. This volume, presented by a roster of prominent figures in the field, documents and showcases the complexity of (im)politeness as social practice by focusing on the morality of (im)politeness in internet-mediated interactions. It includes, among others, studies on how the moral order is made explicit and salient in the production and perception of online impoliteness as social practice and how situated impoliteness can perform positive social and communicative functions. This volume confirms once again that (im)politeness can serve as a lens through which a variety of topics, genres, and contexts are intertwined together pointing to the very presence and existence of human beings, and is bound to be of interest to not only students and scholars engaged in the area of (im)politeness and internet pragmatics, but also to all those with a more general interest in the study of human (inter)actions in various situations and contexts.

Originally published as special issue of Internet Pragmatics 1:2 (2018).

[Benjamins Current Topics, 107]  2020.  v, 177 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
(Im)politeness, morality and the internet
Chaoqun Xie
1–10
The personal and/as the political: Small stories and impoliteness in online discussions of the Greek crisis
Alexandra Georgakopoulou and Maria Vasilaki
11–35
Exploring the moral compass: Denunciations in a Facebook carpool group
Rosina Márquez Reiter and Sara Orthaber
37–65
“Ya bloody drongo!!!”: Impoliteness as situated moral judgement on Facebook
Valeria Sinkeviciute
67–97
Impoliteness and the moral order in online gaming
Sage Lambert Graham
99–123
Impoliteness online: Hate speech in online interactions
Manfred Kienpointner
125–147
The meta-conventionalisation and moral order of e-practices: A Japanese case study
Dániel Z. Kádár and Saeko Fukushima
149–173
Contributors
174–176
Index
177
“Given the growing importance of internet pragmatics, this volume on the moral basis of (im)politeness in online interactions is an excellent and timely addition to existing research. Its high quality contributions are proof of the vibrancy of the field.”
“This timely volume contains three hot areas – the moral order, (im)politeness and internet-mediated interactions – wrapped in one! It reveals the complex interplay amongst these areas, and lights the pathways of future avenues of research. Thought-provoking.”
“Many im/politeness researchers have recently turned their attention to the evaluative nature of im/politeness, the source of which is to be found within moral order. This has triggered extensive research interest into the complex relationship between im/politeness and morality or moral order. The collection of articles (Im)politeness and Moral Order in Online Interactions brings together excellent analyses of this relationship in a number of online contexts and advances our understanding of this multifaceted relationship. The authors show lucidly how presumably inappropriate behaviour elicits situated moral judgements. Such judgements may at times even legitimate impoliteness when viewed as a means of restoring societal moral order and can contribute to sociality as it bonds like-minded people. These timely studies are an essential reading for scholars, researchers and advanced students interested in gaining further insights into the intricate link between (im)politeness and moral order.”
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2021.  In Approaches to Internet Pragmatics [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 318], Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 04 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020011995