“Happiness” and “Pain” across Languages and Cultures

Editors
| Griffith University
| Australian National University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027242723 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027266958 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
In the fast-growing fields of happiness studies and pain research, which have attracted scholars from diverse disciplines including psychology, philosophy, medicine, and economics, this volume provides a much-needed cross-linguistic perspective. It centres on the question of how much ways of talking and thinking about happiness and pain vary across cultures, and seeks to answer this question by empirically examining the core vocabulary pertaining to “happiness” and “pain” in many languages and in different religious and cultural traditions. The authors not only probe the precise meanings of the expressions in question, but also provide extensive cultural contextualization, showing how these meanings are truly cultural. Methodologically, while in full agreement with the view of many social scientists and economists that self-reports are the bedrock of happiness research, the volume presents a body of evidence highlighting the problem of translation and showing how local concepts of “happiness” and “pain” can be understood without an Anglo bias. The languages examined include (Mandarin) Chinese, Danish, English, French, German, Japanese, Koromu (a Papua New Guinean language), and Latin American Spanish.

Originally published in International Journal of Language and Culture Vol. 1:2 (2014).
[Benjamins Current Topics, 84]  2016.  vi, 145 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Articles
Exploring “happiness” and “pain” across languages and cultures
Cliff Goddard and Zhengdao Ye
1–18
“Pain” and “suffering” in cross-linguistic perspective
Anna Wierzbicka
19–43
The story of “Danish Happiness”: Global discourse and local semantics
Carsten Levisen
45–64
The meaning of “happiness” (xìngfú) and “emotional pain” (tòngkŭ) in Chinese
Zhengdao Ye
65–86
Japanese interpretations of “pain” and the use of psychomimes
Yuko Asano-Cavanagh
87–108
Some remarks on “pain” in Latin American Spanish
Zuzanna Bułat-Silva
109–122
The semantics and morphosyntax of tare “hurt/pain” in Koromu (PNG): Verbal and nominal constructions
Carol Priestley
123–141
Index
143–145
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Levisen, Carsten & Sophia Waters
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 03 june 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2016013271