The Initiation of Sound Change

Perception, production, and social factors

Editors
| Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
| Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona & Institut d'Estudis Catalans
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027248411 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027273666 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
The origins of sound change is one of the oldest and most challenging questions in the study of language. The goal of this volume is to examine current approaches to sound change from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives, including articulatory variation and modeling, speech perception mechanisms and neurobiological processes, geographical and social variation, and diachronic phonology. This diversity of perspectives contributes to a fruitful cross-fertilization across disciplines and represents an attempt to formulate converging ideas on the factors that lead to sound change. This book is addressed to scholars in historical linguistics, linguistic typology, and phonology as well as to researchers in speech production and perception, cognition and modeling. Given the theoretical and methodological interest of the contributions as well as the novel instrumental techniques applied to the study of sound change, this volume will interest professionals teaching language typology, laboratory phonology, sound change, phonetics and phonological theory at the graduate level.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 323]  2012.  x, 250 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword and acknowledgements
vii–viii
List of contributors and discussion participants
ix–x
Editors’ introduction
1–18
Part I. Perception
The listener as a source of sound change: An update
John J. Ohala
21–36
Perception grammars and sound change
Patrice Speeter Beddor
37–56
A phonetic interpretation of the sound changes affecting dark /l/ in Romance
Daniel Recasens
57–76
The production and perception of sub-phonemic vowel contrasts and the role of the listener in sound change
Michael Grosvald and David P. Corina
77–100
Part II. Production
The coarticulatory basis of diachronic high back vowel fronting
Jonathan Harrington
103–122
Natural and unnatural patterns of sound change?
Maria-Josep Solé
123–146
The gaits of speech: Re-examining the role of articulatory effort in spoken language
Marianne Pouplier
147–164
Part III. Social factors, structural factors and the typology of change
Prosodic skewing of input and the initiation of cross-generational sound change
Joseph C. Salmons, Robert Allen Fox and Ewa Jacewicz
167–184
Social and personality variables in compensation for altered auditory feedback
Svetlin Dimov, Shira Katseff and Keith Johnson
185–210
Patterns of lexical diffusion and articulatory motivation for sound change
Joan L. Bybee
211–234
Foundational concepts in the scientific study of sound change
Mark Hale
235–246
Index of subjects and terms
247–250
“The study of sound change has a venerable history, dating from the first half of the 19th century, and can be said to have put linguistics on a solid footing as a scientific enterprise. Yet many controversies have remained over the years, making this area still one of the liveliest domains of investigation in historical linguistics and in phonology and phonetics more generally. The present volume adds to the discussion in important and meaningful ways with papers by significant thinkers who insightfully tie the phonetic, the phonological, and the diachronic together, yielding impressive results that draw on the latest theoretical, typological, historical, and experimental approaches”
“Sound change is one of the most recalcitrant puzzles in the study of language and has attracted the attention of researchers from many different perspectives. This volume contains an impressive selection of high quality research by leading scholars on sound change. It is a must-have for all students of sound change, phonetics, phonology, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and historical linguistics.”
“[T]he contributions put forward powerful arguments, almost all of which are backed by innovative empirical studies. The significance of these arguments shines through due to the care the authors take to situate their work within the relevant broader scholarship. [...] As a result of these efforts, the contributions speak to specialists within the particular subfields as well as to linguists working in other areas.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2014.  In Coarticulation and Sound Change in Romance [Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 329], Crossref logo
Esling, John H., Scott R. Moisik, Allison Benner & Lise Crevier-Buchman
2019.  In Voice Quality, Crossref logo
Fertig, David
2016. Mechanisms of paradigm leveling and the role of universal preferences in morphophonological change. Diachronica 33:4  pp. 423 ff. Crossref logo
Stevens, Mary & Jonathan Harrington
2014. The individual and the actuation of sound change. Loquens 1:1  pp. e003 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 08 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFH – Phonetics, phonology
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2012015209 | Marc record