Argument Structure and Syntactic Relations

A cross-linguistic perspective

Editors
| University of the Basque Country & Université de Nantes
| Stony Brook University & University of the Basque Country
| University of the Basque Country
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027255419 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027288134 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
The topic of this collection is argument structure. The fourteen chapters in this book are divided into four parts: Semantic and Syntactic Properties of Event Structure; A Cartographic View on Argument Structure; Syntactic Heads Involved in Argument Structure; and Argument Structure in Language Acquisition. Rigorous theoretical analyses are combined with empirical work on specific aspects of argument structure. The book brings together authors working in different linguistic fields (semantics, syntax, and language acquisition), who explore new findings as well as more established data, but then from new theoretical perspectives. The contributions propose cartographic views of argument structure, as opposed to minimalistic proposals of a binary template model for argument structure, in order to optimally account for various syntactic and semantic facts, as well as data derived from wider cross-linguistic perspectives.
[Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today, 158]  2010.  vi, 348 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Argument structure and syntactic relations
Maia Duguine, Susana Huidobro and Nerea Madariaga
1–10
Part 1. Semantic and syntactic properties of the event structure
Aspectual composition in causatives
Maria Babicheva and Mikhail Ivanov
13–34
Atelicity and anticausativization
Ekaterina Lyutikova and Sergei Tatevosov
35–68
Minimalist variability in the verb phrase
Jonathan E. MacDonald
69–88
On the l-syntax of manner and causation
Jaume Mateu
89–112
Nominalization, event, aspect and argument structure: A syntactic approach
Petra Sleeman and Ana Maria Brito
113–130
Part 2. A global view on argument structure
The syntax of argument structure
Leonard H. Babby
133–150
Argument structure and quantifier scope
John Bowers
151–180
Part 3. Syntactic heads involved in argument structure
An l-syntax for adjuncts
Ángel J. Gallego
183–202
The derivation of dative alternations
Javier Ormazabal and Juan Romero
203–232
Basque ditransitives
Beñat Oyharçabal
233–260
Applicative structure and Mandarin ditransitives
Waltraud Paul and John Whitman
261–282
Unintentionally out of control
Knut Tarald Taraldsen
283–302
Part 4. Argument structure in language acquisition
Zero time-arguments in French child language
Hamida Demirdache and Oana Lungu
305–324
Reevaluating the role of innate linking rules in the acquisition of verb argument structure: Evidence from child Hebrew
Sigal Uziel-Karl
325–344
Name and subject index
345–348
“Argument structure plays a central role in the articulation of syntax. Yet whether this contribution is primordial or derivative, derivational or representational, minimalist or cartographic, is entirely up for grabs. This is what makes a book like the present one equivalent to a murder thriller: one cannot finish one chapter without wanting to read the next. While the solution to the underlying mystery remains as open as it ever was, the clues offered here seem just impossible to ignore.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Bachrach, Asaf, Isabelle Roy & Linnaea Stockall
2014.  In Structuring the Argument [Language Faculty and Beyond, 10],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2010010771