Perspectives on Phonological Theory and Development

In honor of Daniel A. Dinnsen

Editors
| Simon Fraser University
| San Diego State University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027253187 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270542 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Any theory of phonology must be able to account for the acquisition and development of a phonological system, and studying acquisition often leads to reciprocal advances in the theory. This volume explores the link between phonological theory and linguistic development from a variety of angles, including phonological representation, individual differences, and cross-linguistic approaches. Chapters touch on the full spectrum of phonological development, from childhood to adult second-language learning, and from developing dialects to language death. Contributors are leading researchers in the fields of linguistics, speech pathology, and cognitive psychology. A tribute to Daniel A. Dinnsen, the papers in this volume complement his research career by highlighting significant contributions of acquisition research to the development of phonological theory.
[Language Acquisition and Language Disorders, 56]  2014.  viii, 256 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword and tabula gratulatoria
vii–viii
Introduction
Steven B. Chin
1–8
Section 1. Representations and contrast
9–10
Prosodic Licensing and the development of phonological and morphological representations
Katherine Demuth
11–24
Covert contrast in the acquisition of second language phonology
Fred Eckman, Gregory Iverson and Jae Yung Song
25–48
Section 2. Sources of individual differences in phonological acquisition
49–52
Sibling rivalry: Comparing phonological similarity between twin and non-twin siblings
David Ingram and Virginia L. Dubasik
53–70
Abstracting phonological generalizations: Evidence from children with disorders
Judith A. Gierut, Michele L. Morrisette and Caitlin J. Younger
71–90
Rapid phonological coding and working memory dynamics in children with cochlear implants: Cognitive foundations of spoken language processing
David B. Pisoni
91–112
Section 3. Cross-linguistic approaches to phonological acquisition
113–114
What guides children’s acquisition 
of #sC clusters?: A cross-linguistic account
Mehmet Yavaş
115–132
The role of phonological context in children’s overt marking of ‘-s’ in two dialects 
of American English
Jessica A. Barlow and Sonja Pruitt-Lord
133–154
German settlement varieties in Kansas: Some unusual phonological and morphological developments with the approach of language death
William D. Keel
155–172
Section 4. Theoretical advances in the field
173–174
The role of onsets in primary and secondary stress patterns
Laura W. McGarrity
175–198
A faithfulness conspiracy: The selection of unfaithful mappings in Amahl’s grammar
Ashley W. Farris-Trimble
199–222
Superadditivity and limitations on syllable complexity in Bambara words
Christopher R. Green and Stuart Davis
223–248
Author index
249–252
Subject index
253–256
Cited by

Cited by other publications

MILES, KELLY, IVAN YUEN, FELICITY COX & KATHERINE DEMUTH
2016. The prosodic licensing of coda consonants in early speech: interactions with vowel length. Journal of Child Language 43:02  pp. 265 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 17 december 2018. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDC – Language acquisition
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2013049290