In Search of Basic Units of Spoken Language

A corpus-driven approach

Editors
| Tel Aviv University
| Federal University of Minas Gerais
| University of Florence - LABLITA
| Federal University of Minas Gerais
HardboundForthcoming
ISBN 9789027204974 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-BookOrdering information
ISBN 9789027261533 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
What is the best way to analyze spontaneous spoken language? In their search for the basic units of spoken language the authors of this volume opt for a corpus-driven approach. They share a strong conviction that prosodic structure is essential for the study of spoken discourse and each bring their own theoretical and practical experience to the table. In the first part of the book they segment spoken material from a range of different languages (Russian, Hebrew, Central Pomo (an indigenous language from California), French, Japanese, Italian, and Brazilian Portuguese). In the second part of the book each author analyzes the same two spoken English samples, but looking at them from different perspectives, using different methods of analysis as reflected in their respective analyses in Part I. This approach allows for common tendencies of segmentation to emerge, both prosodic and segmental.
[Studies in Corpus Linguistics, 94]  Expected July 2020.  ix, 425 pp. + index
Publishing status: In production
Table of Contents
This is a provisional table of contents, and subject to changes.
In search of a basic unit of spoken language: Segmenting speech
Shlomo Izre'el, Heliana Mello, Alessandro Panunzi and Tommaso Raso
1–32
Part I
Chapter 1. Russian spoken discourse: Local structure and prosody
Andrej A. Kibrik, Nikolay A. Korotaev and Vera I. Podlesskaya
35–72
Chapter 2. The basic unit of spoken language and the interfaces between prosody, discourse and syntax: A View from spontaneous spoken Hebrew
Shlomo Izre'el
73–102
Chapter 3. Prosody and the organization of information in Central Pomo, a California indigenous language
Marianne Mithun
103–122
Chapter 4. Syntactic and prosodic segmentation in spoken French
Jeanne-Marie Debaisieux and Philippe Martin
123–150
Chapter 5. Design and annotation of two-level utterance units in Japanese
Takehiko Maruyama, Yasuharu Den and Hanae Koiso
151–176
Chapter 6. The pragmatic analysis of speech and its illocutionary classification according to the Language into Act Theory
Emanuela Cresti
177–216
Chapter 7. Illocution as a unit of reference for spontaneous speech: An account of insubordinated adverbial clauses in Brazilian Portuguese
Giulia Bossaglia, Heliana Mello and Tommaso Raso
217–252
Chapter 8. Narrative discourse segmentation in clinical linguistics
Mira B. Bergelson and Mariya V. Khudyakova
253–280
Chapter 9. Cross-linguistic comparison of automatic detection of speech breaks in read and narrated speech in four languages
Plínio A. Barbosa
281–296
Part II
Same texts, different approaches to segmentation: An introduction to the second part of the volume
Shlomo Izre'el, Heliana Mello, Alessandro Panunzi and Tommaso Raso
299–304
Chapter 1. Segmentation and analysis of the two English excerpts: The Brazilian team proposal
Tommaso Raso, Plínio A. Barbosa, Frederico A. Cavalcante and Maryualê M. Mittmann
305–322
Chapter 2. Analysis of two English spontaneous speech examples with the dependency incremental prosodic structure model
Philippe Martin
323–332
Chapter 3. Applying criteria of spontaneous Hebrew speech segmentation to English
Shlomo Izre'el
333–344
Chapter 4. Basic units of speech segmentation
Marianne Mithun
345–354
Chapter 5. Segmentation of the English texts Navy and Hearts with SUU and LUU
Takehiko Maruyama
355–362
Chapter 6. The Moscow approach to local discourse structure: An application to English
Andrej A. Kibrik, Nikolay A. Korotaev and Vera I. Podlesskaya
363–376
Chapter 7. Some notes on the Hearts and Navy excerpts according to Language into Act Theory
Emanuela Cresti and Massimo Moneglia
377–396
Chapter 8. Comparing annotations for the prosodic segmentation of spontaneous speech: Focus on reference units
Alessandro Panunzi, Lorenzo Gregori and Bruno Rocha
397–426
Audio files

Chapter 1. Russian spoken discourse

audio

Chapter 2. The basic unit of spoken language and the interfaces between prosody, discourse and syntax

audio

Chapter 3. Prosody and the organization of information in Central Pomo, a California indigenous language

audio

Chapter 4. Syntactic and prosodic segmentation in spoken French

audio

Chapter 5. Design and annotation of two-level utterance units in Japanese

audio

Chapter 6. The pragmatic analysis of speech and its illocutionary classification according to the Language into Act Theory

audio

Chapter 7. Illocution as a unit of reference for spontaneous speech

audio

Chapter 8. Narrative discourse segmentation in clinical linguistics

audio

Chapter 9. Cross-linguistic comparison of automatic detection of speech breaks in read and narrated speech in four languages

audio

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFH – Phonetics, phonology
BISAC Subject: LAN011000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Phonetics & Phonology