The Linguistics of Sign Languages

An introduction

Editors
| University of Amsterdam & Stellenbosch University
| HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht
| University of Amsterdam
| Nederlands Gebarencentrum
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027212306 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027212313 | EUR 36.00 | USD 54.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027267344 | EUR 99.00/36.00*
| USD 149.00/54.00*
 

How different are sign languages across the world? Are individual signs and signed sentences constructed in the same way across these languages? What are the rules for having a conversation in a sign language? How do children and adults learn a sign language? How are sign languages processed in the brain? These questions and many more are addressed in this introductory book on sign linguistics using examples from more than thirty different sign languages. Comparisons are also made with spoken languages.

This book can be used as a self-study book or as a text book for students of sign linguistics. Each chapter concludes with a summary, some test-yourself questions and assignments, as well as a list of recommended texts for further reading.

The book is accompanied by a website containing assignments, video clips and links to web resources.

[Not in series, 199]  2016.  xv, 378 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword
Anne E. Baker, Trude Schermer, Roland Pfau and Beppie van den Bogaerde
xiii–xv
Sign languages as natural languages
Anne E. Baker
1–24
Psycholinguistics
Trude Schermer and Roland Pfau
25–50
Acquisition
Anne E. Baker, Beppie van den Bogaerde and Sonja Jansma
51–72
Interaction and discourse
Anne E. Baker and Beppie van den Bogaerde
73–91
Constituents and word classes
Anne E. Baker and Roland Pfau
93–115
Syntax: simple sentences
Roland Pfau and Heleen F. Bos
117–147
Syntax: complex sentences
Roland Pfau
149–172
Lexicon
Trude Schermer
173–195
Morphology
Roland Pfau
197–228
Phonetics
Onno A. Crasborn
229–249
Phonology
Els van der Kooij and Onno A. Crasborn
251–278
Language variation and standardisation
Trude Schermer
279–298
Language contact and change
Trude Schermer and Roland Pfau
299–324
Bilingualism and deaf education
Beppie van den Bogaerde, Marjolein Buré and Connie Fortgens
325–336
Appendix 1: Notation conventions
337–341
Appendix 2: Examples of manual alphabets
343–344
References
345–369
Index
371–378
Cited by

Cited by 16 other publications

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2020.  In Cultural Conceptualizations in Translation and Language Applications [Second Language Learning and Teaching, ],  pp. 249 ff. Crossref logo
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2018.  In Sign Languages,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
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2019.  In 2019 IEEE International Symposium on INnovations in Intelligent SysTems and Applications (INISTA),  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
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2017. Introduction. African Studies 76:3  pp. 315 ff. Crossref logo
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2017. Rainbow: Constructing a gay Deaf black South African identity in a SASL poem. African Studies 76:3  pp. 337 ff. Crossref logo
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2016.  In Concise Lexicon for Sign Linguistics, Crossref logo
Reagan, Timothy
2020. A twelfth official language? The constitutional future of South African Sign Language. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 38:1  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 04 april 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFZ – Sign languages, Braille & other linguistic communication
BISAC Subject: LAN017000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Sign Language
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015047984 | Marc record