The Art and Architecture of Academic Writing

| New York City College of Technology, City University of New York
| University of Iceland
HardboundForthcoming
ISBN 9789027207524 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
PaperbackForthcoming
ISBN 9789027207517 | EUR 33.00 | USD 49.95
 
e-BookOrdering information
ISBN 9789027260772 | EUR 95.00/33.00*
| USD 143.00/49.95*
 
This book is a bridge to confident academic writing for advanced non-native English users. It emphasizes depth over breadth through mastery of core writing competencies and strategies which apply to most academic disciplines and genres. Tailored to students in EMI programs, the content was piloted and revised during a longitudinal writing study. The innovative approach prepares students to write for the academic community through the dual lenses of Art (developing a writer’s voice through choices in language, style, and topics) and Architecture (mastering norms of academic language, genre, and organization.) The user-friendly text maximizes time for writing practice and production by avoiding lengthy readings. Part 1 builds skills and confidence in writing by focusing on assignments that do not require research. Part 2 applies newly mastered principles, skills, and strategies to research-based writing. Students learn to incorporate thesis, research, and evidence into a process for academic writing by following the AWARE framework (Arranging to write, Writing, Assessing, Revising, and Editing.)
[Not in series, 231]  Expected August 2021.  x, 293 pp. + index
Publishing status: In production
Table of Contents
This is a provisional table of contents, and subject to changes.
Part I. Developing Your Academic Voice
4–155
Chapter 1. The Art of Academic Writing
4–22
Chapter 2. The Architecture of Academic Writing
24–44
Chapter 3. AWARE: A Framework for Thesis-Driven Writing
46–67
Chapter 4. Description and Narrative in Thesis-Driven Writing
70–87
Chapter 5. The Body of the Essay
90–109
Chapter 6. Compare/Contrast and Cause/Effect
112–135
Chapter 7. Introductions and Conclusions
138–155
Part II. Presenting the Views of Others
160–293
Chapter 8. Research to Support a Thesis
160–179
Chapter 9. Conducting Research for a Case Study
182–205
Chapter 10. Writing the Case Study
208–236
Chapter 11. Conducting Research for an Academic Paper
238–266
Chapter 12. Writing the Research Paper
268–293
Checklist for revising and proofreading
Index
References
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Subjects & Metadata

Communication Studies

Communication Studies
BIC Subject: CBW – Writing & editing guides
BISAC Subject: LAN005010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Writing / Academic & Scholarly
ONIX Metadata
ONIX 2.1
ONIX 3.0
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020050367 | Marc record