Polylogues on The Mental Lexicon

An exploration of fundamental issues and directions

Editors
| Brock University
| Université de Montréal
| McMaster University
HardboundForthcoming
ISBN 9789027209252 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-BookOrdering information
ISBN 9789027259615 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
From its beginnings, the study of the mental lexicon has been at the crossroads of research and scholarship. This volume presents a polylogue--a textual conversation of many voices. It is designed to capture the excitement within the field and generate a deeper understanding of key issues and debates for established researchers, students, and readers interested in language and cognition. The first chapter examines how the mental lexicon itself can be seen as a polylogue. In the following six chapters, authors tackle the fundamental questions concerning future research on lexical representation and processing in an interactive structure that presents new perspectives and captures the excitement of the field. The themes include the value of cross-linguistic megastudies, the nature of meaning, how to capture truly natural language, what can be learned from lexical acquisition, the advantages of a functionalist perspective, and the role of schemas in understanding morphology and the lexicon.
[Not in series, 238]  Expected October 2021.  viii, 220 pp. + index
Publishing status: In production
Table of Contents
This is a provisional table of contents, and subject to changes.
Preface
Chapter 1. The mental lexicon as polylogue
Victor Kuperman, Gonia Jarema and Gary Libben
Chapter 2. Meta-megastudies
James Myers
Chapter 3. Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain: Explaining semantics without semantics
Chris Westbury
Chapter 4. Why we need to investigate casual speech to truly understand language production, processing and the mental lexicon
Benjamin V. Tucker and Mirjam Ernestus
Chapter 5. Hebrew adjective lexicons in developmental perspective: Subjective register and morphology
Dorit Ravid, Amalia Bar-On, Ronit Levie and Odelia Douani
Chapter 6. Functionalism in the lexicon: Where is it, and how did it get there?
Russell Richie
Chapter 7. Morphological schemas: Theoretical and psycholinguistic issues
Ray Jackendoff and Jenny Audring
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFD – Psycholinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009040 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Psycholinguistics