Advances in Interpreting Research

Inquiry in action

Editors
| San Diego State University
| St. Catherine University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027224477 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027283023 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
With the growing emphasis on scholarship in interpreting, this collection tackles issues critical to the inquiry process — from theoretical orientations in Interpreting Studies to practical considerations for conducting a research study. As a landmark volume, it charts new territory by addressing a range of topics germane to spoken and signed language interpreting research. Both provocative and pragmatic, this volume captures the thinking of an international slate of interpreting scholars including Daniel Gile, Franz Pöchhacker, Debra Russell, Barbara Moser-Mercer, Melanie Metzger, Cynthia Roy, Minhua Liu, Jemina Napier, Lorraine Leeson, Jens Hessmann, Graham Turner, Eeva Salmi, Svenja Wurm, Rico Peterson, Robert Adam, Christopher Stone, Laurie Swabey and Brenda Nicodemus. Experienced academics will find ideas to stimulate their passion and commitment for research, while students will gain valuable insights within its pages. This new volume is essential reading for anyone involved in interpreting research.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 99]  2011.  xi, 264 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
vii–x
xi
Introduction
Laurie Swabey and Brenda Nicodemus
1–4
Researching interpreting: Approaches to inquiry
Franz Pöchhacker
5–26
Designing a research project: Beginning with the end in mind
Debra Russell
27–46
Identifying and interpreting scientific phenomena: Simultaneous challenges to interpreting research
Barbara Moser-Mercer
47–58
The first three years of a three-year grant: When a research plan doesn’t go as planned
Melanie Metzger and Cynthia B. Roy
59–84
Methodology in interpreting studies: A methodological review of evidence-based research
Minhua Liu
85–120
If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a noise?: The merits of publishing interpreting research
Jemina Napier
121–152
“Mark my words”: The linguistic, social, and political significance of the assessment of signed language interpreters
Lorraine Leeson
153–176
Developing and transmitting a shared interpreting research ethos: EUMASLI – A case study
Jens Hessmann, Eeva Salmi, Graham H. Turner and Svenja Wurm
177–198
Profession in pentimento: A narrative inquiry into interpreting in video settings
Rico Peterson
199–224
Through a historical lens: Contextualizing interpreting research
Robert Adam and Christopher Stone
225–240
Bimodal bilingual interpreting in the U.S. healthcare system: A critical linguistic activity in need of investigation
Laurie Swabey and Brenda Nicodemus
241–260
Index
261–264
“Advancing interpreting as a professional discipline demands theory and pedagogy built upon critical inquiry into practice and outcomes. Going a step beyond the explosion of interpreting research in the last three decades, this volume reflexively explores the scope, theoretical approaches, and impacts of that research, and exemplifies new methods and issues for inquiry. This collection of esteemed researchers' perspectives makes a valuable contribution to mapping the development of academic thought in the field of interpreting.”
“Brenda Nicodemus and Laurie Swabey have put together an important collection of papers that represent the status of research in Interpreting Studies. From a theoretical exploration of issues underlying the discipline to a more empirical part in which researchers share their studies and give valuable insights about their experiences, the volume underscores the most crucial problem we have in Interpreting Studies: the findings of research are still not impacting practice at the pace we would need. In the editors’ words: “new knowledge is cultivated when a community shares ideas”. Within the community of Interpreting Studies and beyond, we welcome the opportunity the authors present to us as we take up the challenge of sharing more ideas and learning from each other.”
“My hat is off to Nicodemus and Swabey, who have assembled a volume with contributions by experts from around the globe. The editors have captured the importance of reflecting on historical events while also helping to guide the profession into the future by highlighting various aspects of empirical research. This volume will prove to be an important resource for years to come.”
“This book is essential for anyone contemplating or actively engaged in research in the field of Interpreting Studies. The editors have put together a star-studded cast of the leading lights in IS from all over the world, including both signed and spoken language interpreting. Covering an impressive array of topics, this volume offers concrete and encouraging guidance for so-called "practisearchers," i.e., practicing interpreters who also conduct research.”
“This book provides useful and very accessible practical advice for beginning researchers in the field of interpreting. Another big advantage of the volume is that it brings together researchers representing various branches of interpreting (signed language, spoken language, conference, public service) and various research traditions, showing both gains of sharing ideas and the importance of attending to differences.”
Advances in Interpreting Research: Inquiry in Action is a brilliant compilation of important new research on interpreting. It illuminates the long-awaited confluence of signed and spoken language interpreting. The editors, Laurie Swabey and Brenda Nicodemus, have collected landmark papers by well-respected researchers from around the world that, in combination, are sure to set a powerful precedent for future collaboration. I am especially heartened to see a strong bridge being built between theory and practice. Advances in Interpreting Research: Inquiry in Action is now on my recommendation list for interpreters, interpreter educators, and students of interpreting.”
“While writing my own thesis last year I struggled to find sound guidance on how to carry out research in interpreting. I know I am not the only one who has faced this challenge. Advances in Interpreting Research does an excellent job of providing crucial inspiration and information to all those involved in carrying out research in interpreting. The editors have managed to bring together the current research experts in our field, not merely focusing on sign language interpreting but combining it with the expertise in the spoken language interpreting field. I am confident that the content of this volume will stimulate further well-needed research in sign and spoken language interpreting.”
“By bringing together topics pertinent to interpreting in both the signed and spoken modes, this volume makes an invaluable contribution to the field. It will undoubtedly have far-reaching implications, especially in countries like China, where signed language interpreting is only starting to be recognized within the larger domain of Interpreting Studies.”
“A wide-ranging but not disconnected collection of papers that marks clear progress towards professionalisation in the field of SLI, and reflects a consensus about its prerequisites: more research and a more solid basis for training, converging on more informed practice.”
“This volume offers grounded and pragmatic answers to the reasons why evidence-based, analytical investigations are needed in Interpreting Studies; hence contributions are also extremely pragmatic in nature, ranging from discussions of ontological and phenomenological lines of enquiry.”
“This collection charts new territory by addressing a range of topics germane to spoken and signed language interpreting research. Both provocative and pragmatic, this volume captures the thinking of an international slate of interpreting scholars. Experienced academics will find ideas to stimulate their passion and commitment for research, while students will gain valuable insights. Essential reading for anyone involved in interpreting research.”
“The chapters together express a consensus: that there is a need to emphasize and reinforce research, refine methodological approaches, and engage in professional training. Advances in Interpreting Research: Inquiry in action is an excellent collection that discusses why we should research the field of interpreting and what we can do with the research. Many exciting challenges and opportunities coexist in this field.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Gile, Daniel
2012.  In Handbook of Translation Studies [Handbook of Translation Studies, 3],  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
Hsieh, Elaine & Sachiko Terui
2015. Inherent Tensions and Challenges of Oncologist–Patient Communication: Implications for Interpreter Training in Health-care Settings. Journal of Applied Communication Research 43:2  pp. 141 ff. Crossref logo
Nicodemus, Brenda
2017. Review of Bendazzoli, Claudio & Claudia Monacelli, (Eds.) (2016)Addressing methodological challenges in interpreting studies research. Interpreting 19:2  pp. 288 ff. Crossref logo
Sadowski, Caitlin & Jaeheon Yi
2014.  In Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Evaluation and Usability of Programming Languages and Tools - PLATEAU '14,  pp. 43 ff. Crossref logo
Turner, Graham H. & Andrew J. Merrison
2016. Doing ‘understanding’ in dialogue interpreting. Interpreting 18:2  pp. 137 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011032508