Word Classes

Nature, typology and representations

Editors
| Roma Tre University
| Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027248510 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269768 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
The universal and typological status of the notion of word class — closely related to part-of-speech systems, morphology, syntax and the lexicon-syntax interface — continues to be of major linguistic theoretical interest. The papers included in this volume offer a fresh look at the variety of current theoretical and descriptive approaches to word class issues, and present original analyses and new data from a number of languages. The primary focus is on methods (including computational ones) and criteria for identifying and representing major word classes and subclasses in specific languages, with considerable attention also directed towards the characterization of the nature and role of minor — or neglected — word classes, including trans-categorization processes. The range of topics and perspectives covered makes this volume of considerable interest to both theoretical linguists and typologists.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 332]  2014.  vii, 293 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword and acknowledgements
vii
Introduction: New approaches to old Word Class issues
Raffaele Simone and Francesca Masini
1–14
PART I. Types of word classes
Carving verb classes from corpora
Alessandro Lenci
17–36
Classes of creation verbs
Elisabetta Jezek
37–50
On Light Nouns
Raffaele Simone and Francesca Masini
51–74
The ‘new adjectives’ of Tswana
Denis Creissels
75–94
The Chinese adjective as a word class
Giorgio Francesco Arcodia
95–118
Qualifying modifier encoding and adjectival typology
Luca Alfieri
119–138
PART II. Minor and neglected word classes
Hungarian is a classifier language
Anikó Csirmaz and Éva Dékány
141–160
Cardinal numerals: A syntax-semantics interface analysis
Rossella Pannain and Anna Riccio
161–180
On the borders of neglected word classes: From preverbs to ‘satellites’ via adverbs and particles
Anna Sőrés
181–200
PART III. Across word classes
Between adjective and noun: Category/function mismatch, constructional overrides and coercion
Peter Lauwers
203–226
On decategorization and its relevance in German
Livio Gaeta
227–242
PART IV. Radical views: Do we really need word classes?
Word-class features and reduplicative meaning: The case of Modern Greek
Haritini Kallergi
245–262
Half and other unique words: Corpus patterns and lexicalist syntax
Maarten Janssen
263–282
Index of languages
283–284
Index of names
285–288
Index of subjects
289–293
“[T]he book will be welcome to all who are looking for empirical testing grounds for their categorization theories. Many of the gradual (and not so gradual) linguistic distinctions underlying the categories presented here will hopefully lay one simplistic assumption to rest: A handful of 'word classes' handed down from antiquity will not help us in defining satisfactory linguistic theories. Given the lack of attention this important fact often recieves, this is a very welcome result indeed.”
“Given that word classes have been treated numerous times in modern linguistics, this volume might at first sight appear to be an unremarkable and perhaps unnecessary addition to the pile. However, such an assumption would be terribly misguided. Much of the research reported in the volume is groundbreaking and provides new insights into the increasingly complex world of word classes. Several contributions in the book cover aspects of word classes that have either not been addressed before or which have not received much attention. In this respect, the book as a whole constitutes an important contribution to the study of word classes.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014016852 | Marc record