Style, Rhetoric and Creativity in Language

In memory of Walter (Bill) Nash (1926-2015)

Editor
| Liverpool University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027204301 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261953 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This commemorative volume comprises ten essays which celebrate the work of Walter (Bill) Nash. Bill Nash was an extraordinary scholar – a classicist, parodist, critic, musician, linguist, poet, polyglot, humourist and novelist. He was as adroit in his reading of the Old Norse sagas as he was in his analyses of the rhetorical composition of everyday English usage, and his published outputs embrace the stylistic, rhetorical, compositional and creative topographies of both language and literature. The contributions that comprise this volume are all by well-known scholars in the field and each essay celebrates Nash’s prodigious offering by covering the academic fields with which he was particularly associated. These fields include composition, rhetoric, discourse analysis, English usage, comic discourse, creative writing and the stylistic exploration of literature from the Old English period to that of the present day.
[Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 34]  2019.  ix, 205 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Paul Simpson and Ronald Carter
1–7
An indicative list of publications by Walter Nash
9
Chapter 1. “Warmth of thought” in Walter Nash’s prose and verse
Susan Cockcroft and Robert Cockcroft
11–35
Chapter 2. Chrysanthemums for Bill: On Lawrentian style and stylistics
Peter Stockwell
37–55
Chapter 3. The doubling of design in Walter Nash’s Rhetoric: The Wit of Persuasion
David E. Stacey
57–75
Chapter 4. Riddling: The dominant rhetorical device in W. H. Auden’s “The Wanderer”
Peter Verdonk
77–84
Chapter 5. “My Shakespeare, rise”: Ben Jonson’s pronominal choices in “To the Memory of My Beloved, the Author” (1623)
Clara Calvo
85–100
Chapter 6. Discourse presentation and point of view in “Cheating at Canasta” by William Trevor
Mick Short
101–111
Chapter 7. Doing and teaching: From Kettle of Roses to Language and Creative Illusion and back again
Michael Toolan
113–125
Chapter 8. Fact, fiction and French flights of fancy
Michael Stubbs
127–148
Chapter 9. Common Language: Corpus, creativity and cognition*
Ronald Carter
149–170
Chapter 10. “Americans don’t do Irony”: Cross-cultural perspectives on the pragmatics of irony
Paul Simpson
171–192
POEM
Defunct Address
193
Name index
195–197
Subject index
199–205
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN015000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Rhetoric
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019030624