Cross Currents in Second Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theory

Editors
| San José State University and Stanford University
| San José State University and Stanford University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027224637 (Eur) | EUR 156.00
ISBN 9781556192357 (USA) | USD 234.00
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027224668 (Eur) | EUR 36.00
ISBN 9781556192388 (USA) | USD 54.00
e-Book
ISBN 9789027281807 | EUR 156.00/36.00*
| USD 234.00/54.00*
 
The term “crosscurrent” is defined as “a current flowing counter to another.” This volume represents crosscurrents in second language acquisition and linguistic theory in several respects. First, although the main currents running between linguistics and second language acquisition have traditionally flowed from theory to application, equally important contributions can be made in the other direction as well. Second, although there is a strong tendency in the field of linguistics to see “theorists” working within formal models of syntax, SLA research can contribute to linguistic theory more broadly defined to include various functional as well as formal models of syntax, theories of phonology, variationist theories of sociolinguists, etc. These assumptions formed the basis for a conference held at Stanford University during the Linguistic Institute there in the summer of 1987. The conference was organized to update the relation between second language acquisition and linguistic theory. This book contains a selection of (mostly revised and updated) papers of this conference and two newly written papers.
[Language Acquisition and Language Disorders, 2]  1991.  viii, 435 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
vii
I. Overview
Second language acquisition: litmus test for linguistic theory?
Thom Huebner
3
Recent trends in syntactic theory
Peter Sells
23
Typology/universals and second language acquisition
Joseph H. Greenberg
37
II. From Theories to Hypothesis Testing
Prosodic phonology: second language acquisition data as evidence in theoretical phonology
Irene Vogel
47
Natural morphology: the organization of paradigms and language acquisition
Joan L. Bybee
67
Typological text analysis: tense and aspects in creoles and second languages
John Myhill
93
Relational grammar: L2 learning and the components of L1 knowledge
Carol Rosen
123
Government-binding: parameter-setting in second language acquisition and implications for theoretical linguistics
Wolfgang Klein
169
Functionalist linguistics: discourse structure and language processing in second language acquisition
Ann Cooreman and Kerry Kilborn
195
Variation theory: implicational scaling and critical age limits in models of linguistic variation, acquisition and change
John R. Rickford
225
III. From Data to Model Building
Perception and production: the relevance of phonetic input to L2 phonological learning
James Emil Flege
249
The teaching of intonation: classroom experiences to theoretical models
Ann C. Cessaris and Dwight Bolinger
291
Developmental sequences: the emergence of aspect marking in second language acquisition
Roger W. Andersen
305
Cross-generational bilingualism: theoretical implications of language attrition
Carmen Silva-Corvalán
325
Modality and second language learning: a challenge for linguistic theory
Norbert Dittmar and Heiner Terborg
347
Narrative and description: temporal reference in second language acquisition
Christiane von Stutterheim
385
Cross-linguistic comparisons: organizational principles in learner languages
Clive Perdue
405
IV. Conclusions
Currents between second language acquisition and linguistic theory
Charles A. Ferguson
425
Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  91017382
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