From Pragmatics to Dialogue

Editors
| University of Münster
| State University of New York, Albany
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201188 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263742 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This volume aims at building bridges from pragmatics to dialogue and overcoming the gap between two ‘circles’ which have cut themselves off from each other in recent decades even if both addressed the same object, ‘language use’. Pragmatics means the study of natural language use. There is however no clear answer as to what language use means. We are instead confronted with multiple and diverse models in an uncircumscribed field of language use. When trying to transform such a puzzle of pieces into a meaningful picture we are confronted with the complexity of language use which does not mean ‘language’ put to ‘use’ but represents the unity of a complex whole and calls for a total change in methodology towards a holistic theory. Human beings as dialogic individuals use language as dialogue which allows them to tackle the vicissitudes of their lives. Dialogue and its methodology of action and reaction can be traced back to human nature and provides the key to the unstructured field of pragmatics. The contributions to this volume share this common ground and address various perspectives in different types of action game.
[Dialogue Studies, 31]  2018.  v, 222 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
Edda Weigand and Istvan Kecskes
1–4
Dialogue: The key to pragmatics
Edda Weigand
5–28
Humboldt, Bhartrihari, and the dialogic
Lisbeth A. Lipari
29–44
Moving beyond pragmatics: The role of dialogue in studies of “rhetoric in situ”
Jennifer L. Adams
45–60
Progress in language teaching: From competence to dialogic competence-in-performance
Marion Grein
61–82
Research interview as social interaction: Epistemic implications
Letizia Caronia
83–112
Bounded segments of interaction: The case of redressing the breach of a cultural norm once it is flagged
Robert E. Sanders and Anita Pomerantz
113–136
Dialogicity in written language use: Variation across expert action games
Marina Bondi
137–170
Dialogic pragmatics and complex objects: Engaging the life and work of Gregory Bateson
Ronald C. Arnett
171–188
Types and functions of pseudo-dialogues
Arto Mustajoki, Tatiana Sherstinova and Ulla Tuomarla
189–216
List of contributors
217
Index
221
“All language is dialogic, whether we talk with others or with ourselves. If pragmatics is the study of how we collaborate using language, we must study dialogic performance. Eminent scholars in the field of pragmatics, dialogue studies and the philosophy of language present arguments for a paradigm change in linguistics, moving our focus from the individual mind to the verbal interaction happening between people.”
“What can pragmatics, conceived as the detailed study of language use, learn from dialogue studies? This is the key question this wonderful volume addresses by building bridges between two fields that too often tend to ignore each other. A must read for anyone interested in investigating the dialogical aspects of life, language and communication.”
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2019.  In English as a Lingua Franca, Crossref logo
Salam El-Dakhs, Dina Abdel, Jawaher Nasser Al-Haqbani, Manal A. Althaqafi & Shorouq Al-Fouzan
2019. How do Saudis complain?. Language and Dialogue 9:2  pp. 264 ff. Crossref logo
Săftoiu, Răzvan
2019. The Dialogic Turn in Language Study. Language and Dialogue 9:3  pp. 471 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2018. The theory myth. Language and Dialogue 8:2  pp. 289 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 09 april 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018015641