Contemporary Trends in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics

Selected papers from the Hispanic Linguistic Symposium 2015

Editor
| University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027200013 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027264619 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Contemporary Trends in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics offers a panorama of current research into multiple varieties of Spanish from several different regions (Mexico, Puerto Rico, Spain, Costa Rica, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, Honduras), Catalan, Brazilian Portuguese, as well as varieties in contact with English and Purépecha. The first part of the volume focuses on the structural aspects and use of these languages in the areas of syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, diachrony, phonetics, phonology and morphology. The second part discusses the effect of interacting multiple grammars, namely, first language acquisition, second language acquisition, varieties in contact, and bilingualism. As a whole, the contributions in this volume provide a methodological balance between qualitative and quantitative approaches to Language and, in this way, represent contemporary trends in Hispanic and Lusophone linguistics.
[Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, 15]  2018.  ix, 376 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
ix–x
Introduction
Jonathan E. MacDonald
1–8
Part 1. Language structure and use
11–209
Chapter 1. se-marked directed motion constructions: Anticausatives and figure reflexives
Grant Armstrong
11–30
Chapter 2. Subcategorization and change: A diachronic analysis of sin embargo (de que)
Patrícia Amaral and Manuel Delicado Cantero
31–48
Chapter 3. Variable clitic placement in US Spanish
Philip P. Limerick
49–70
Chapter 4. Variable negative concord in Brazilian Portuguese: Acceptability and frequency
Tainara D. Agostini and Scott A. Schwenter
71–94
Chapter 5. The simultaneous lenition of Spanish /ptk/ and /bdɡ/ as a chain shift in progress
Christopher D. Eager
95–120
Chapter 6. Are Argentines a-blind?: Acceptability of a-marked inanimate direct objects
Mark R. Hoff
121–142
Chapter 7. The importance of motivated comparisons in variationist studies
Whitney Chappell
143–168
Chapter 8. The past persists into the present: A multivariate analysis of present perfect and preterite in Southern Arizona Spanish narratives
Abel Cruz Flores
169–190
Chapter 9. “El vos nuestro es, ¡Ey vos, chigüín!”: Honduran vos as a marker of national identity
Jeriel Melgares
191–210
Part 2. Interacting grammars
213–372
Chapter 10. Acquisition of articulatory control or language-specific coarticulatory patterns?: Evidence from the production of laterals in second-language Spanish
Megan Solon
213–236
Chapter 11. Voice onset time and the child foreign language learner of Spanish
Mandy R. Menke
237–258
Chapter 12. “Extraña uno lo que es la tortillas”: A preliminary study of number agreement in Spanish in contact with Purépecha
Andrea Mojedano Batel
259–280
Chapter 13. Mothers’ use of F0 after the first year of life in American English and Peninsular Spanish
Covadonga Sánchez-Alvarado, Alba Arias, Eduardo García Fernández, Isaac McAlister and Meghan E. Armstrong
281–308
Chapter 14. Extra-syntactic factors in the that-trace effect
Jeanne Heil and Shane Ebert
309–332
Chapter 15. An initial examination of imperfect subjunctive variation in Catalonian Spanish: A contact linguistics and usage-based approach
Sean McKinnon
333–354
Chapter 16. Testing English influence on first person singular “yo” subject pronoun expression in Sonoran Spanish
Ryan M. Bessett
355–372
Index
373–376
Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2AD – Linguistics/Romance, Italic & Rhaeto-Romanic languages
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017045520 | Marc record