Style and Reader Response

Minds, media, methods

Editors
| Sheffield Hallam University
| Sheffield Hallam University
| Sheffield Hallam University
| Sheffield Hallam University
HardboundForthcoming
ISBN 9789027208057 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-BookOrdering information
ISBN 9789027260376 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Style and Reader Response: Minds, media, methods profiles the diversity of theoretical and methodological approaches in reception-oriented research in stylistics. Collectively, the chapters investigate how real readers, players, audiences, and viewers respond to, experience, and interpret texts. Contributions to the book investigate discourse types such as contemporary literature, poetry, political speeches, digital fiction, art exhibitions, and online news discourse. The volume also exemplifies the variety of empirical approaches in reception research, with contributors drawing on a range of methods including discussion groups, interviews, questionnaires, and think-aloud protocols with data analysed from both online and offline sources. Style and Reader Response makes an important contribution to an emerging paradigm within stylistics in which verifiable insights from readers are used to generate new models and new understandings of texts across media, with each essay demonstrating the centrality of empirical research for theoretical, methodological, and/or analytical advancements within and beyond stylistics.
[Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 36]  Expected February 2021.  vii, 229 pp. + index
Publishing status: In production
Table of Contents
This is a provisional table of contents, and subject to changes.
Acknowledgements
vii–viii
Chapter 1. Responding to style
Alice Bell, Sam Browse, Alison Gibbons and David Peplow
1–20
Section I. Minds
Chapter 2. Interpretation in interaction: On the dialogic nature of response
David Peplow and Sara Whiteley
21–42
Chapter 3. Modelling an unethical mind
Jessica Norledge
43–60
Chapter 4. Towards an empirical stylistics of critical reception: The oppositional reader in political discourse
Sam Browse
61–80
Chapter 5. A cognitive and cultural reader response theory of character construction
Julia Kristina Vaessen and Sven Strasen
81–98
Section II. Media
Chapter 6. “Why do you insist that Alana is not real?”: Visitors’ perceptions of the fictionality of Andi and Lance Olsen’s ‘there’s no place like time’ exhibition
Alison Gibbons
99–122
Chapter 7. Reading hyperlinks in hypertext fiction: An Empirical Approach
Isabelle van der Bom, Lyle Skains, Alice Bell and Astrid Ensslin
123–142
Chapter 8. Evaluating news events: Using appraisal for reader response
Martine van Driel
143–162
Section III. Methods
Chapter 9. In defence of introspection
Peter Stockwell
163–178
Chapter 10. Reading the readers: Ethical and methodological issues for researching readers and reading in the digital age
Bronwen Thomas
179–196
Chapter 11. Extra-textuality and affective intensities: Moving out from readers to people, places, and things
Hugh Escott
197–216
Chapter 12. Postscript: Toward a reconciliation of empirical traditions in the investigation of reading and literature
Moniek M. Kuijpers
217–230
Subjects

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Literature & Literary Studies

Theoretical literature & literary studies
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics