Corpora and the Changing Society

Studies in the evolution of English

Editors
| University of Eastern Finland
| Tampere University
| Tampere University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205438 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261311 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book showcases eleven studies dealing with corpora and the changing society. The theme of the volume reflects the fact that changes in society lead to changes in language and vice versa. Focusing on the English language, be it from Old English to the present, or a shorter time span in the immediate past, the contributors in this volume use a variety of corpus methods to address the two patterns of change. The cross-fertilization of cultural studies and corpus linguistics, we hope, is beneficial for both parties, as corpus linguistics offers a vast array of materials and methods to investigate cultural and societal change, while cultural studies provide the theoretical background on which to build our research. The studies included in the present volume illustrate the potential avenues and the merits of combining changing language and changing societies.
[Studies in Corpus Linguistics, 96]  2020.  xii, 305 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii
Introduction: Corpora and the changing society
Paula Rautionaho, Arja Nurmi and Juhani Klemola
ix–xii
The great temptation: What diachronic corpora do and do not reveal about social change
Martin Hilpert
3–27
Changes in society and language: Charting poverty
Gerold Schneider
29–56
Finding evidence for a changing society: A collocational study of medical discourse in 1500–1800
Maura Ratia
57–78
Semantic neology: Challenges in matching corpus-based semantic change to real-world change
Antoinette Renouf
79–111
From burden to threat: A diachronic study of language ideology and migrant representation in the British press
Gavin Brookes and David Wright
113–140
That’s absolutely fine: An investigation of absolutely in the spoken BNC2014
Karin Aijmer
143–167
Two sides of the same coin?: Tracking the history of the intensifiers deadly and mortal
Zeltia Blanco-Suárez
169–197
So-called -ingly adverbs in Late Middle and Early Modern English
Yoko Iyeiri
199–222
Analyzing change in the American English amplifier system in the fiction genre
Martin Schweinberger
223–249
Part I. Changing society
4–140
The development and pragmatic function of a non-inference marker: That is not to say (that)
Laurel J. Brinton
251–275
Changes in transitivity and reflexive uses of sit (me/myself down) in Early and Late Modern English
Turo Vartiainen and Mikko Höglund
277–302
Part II. Changing language
141–302
Index
303–305
Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2AB – Linguistics/English
BISAC Subject: LAN009010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020002384 | Marc record