Chapters of Dependency Grammar

A historical survey from Antiquity to Tesnière

Editors
| Eszterházy Károly University, Eger
| University of Liège
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027204769 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261700 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Was Tesnière the founding father of dependency grammar or merely a culmination point in its long history? Leaving no doubt that the latter position is correct, Chapters of Dependency Grammar tells the story of how dependency-oriented grammatical description developed from Antiquity up to the early 20th century. From Priscian’s Rome to Dmitrievsky’s Russia, from the French Encyclopaedia to Stephen W. Clark’s school grammars in 19th century America, it is shown how the concept of dependencies (asymmetric word-to-word relations) surfaced again and again, assuming a central place in syntax. A particularly intriguing aspect of the storyline is that even without any direct contact or influence, authors were making key breakthroughs in similar directions. In the works of Sámuel Brassai, a Transylvanian polymath, and Franz Kern, a German grammarian, the first dependency trees appear in 1873 and 1883, respectively, predating Tesnière’s stemmas by several decades.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 212]  2020.  v, 281 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Aspects of the theory and history of dependency grammar
Nicolas Mazziotta and András Imrényi
2–22
Chapter 1. Syntactic relations in ancient and medieval grammatical theory
Anneli Luhtala
24–57
Chapter 2. The notion of dependency in Latin grammar in the Renaissance and the 17th century
Bernard Colombat
60–84
Chapter 3. How dependency syntax appeared in the French Encyclopedia: From Buffier (1709) to Beauzée (1765)
Sylvain Kahane
86–131
Chapter 4. Dependency in early sentence diagrams: Stephen W. Clark
Nicolas Mazziotta
134–162
Chapter 5. Sámuel Brassai in the history of dependency grammar
András Imrényi and Zsuzsa Vladár
164–187
Chapter 6. Franz Kern: An early dependency grammarian
Timothy Osborne
190–213
Chapter 7. Some aspects of dependency in Otto Jespersen’s structural syntax
Lorenzo Cigana
216–251
Chapter 8. The Russian trail: Dmitrievsky, the little drama metaphor and dependency grammar
Patrick Sériot
254–275
Index nominum
277–278
Index rerum
279–281
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009060 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Syntax
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019044647