Why Writing Matters

Issues of access and identity in writing research and pedagogy

Editors
| Lancaster University
| The Open University, UK
| Lancaster University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027218070 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027289735 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This book brings together the work of scholars from around the world – UK, Pakistan, US, South Africa, Hungary, Korea, Mexico – to illustrate and celebrate the many ways in which Roz Ivanič has advanced the academic study of writing. Focusing on writing in different formal contexts of education, from primary through to further and higher education in a range of national contexts, the twenty one original contributions in the book critically engage with theoretical and empirical issues raised in Ivanič’s influential body of work. In their exploration of writers’ struggles with the demands of dominant literacy the authors significantly extend understandings of writing practices in formal institutions. Organized around three themes central to Ivanič’s work – creativity and identity; pedagogy; and research methodologies – the twelve chapters and nine personal and scholarly reflections reveal the powerful ways in which Ivanič’s work has influenced thinking in the field of writing and continues to open up avenues for future questioning and research.
[Studies in Written Language and Literacy, 12]  2009.  xxxii, 254 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface. Roz Ivanič's writing and identity
David Barton
ix–xiii
Introduction
Awena Carter
xv–xxii
List of contributors
xxiii–xxviii
Acknowledgements
xxix
List of figures
xxxi
Part I. Creativity and identity
Reflection 1. Writing a narrative of multiple voices
Courtney B. Cazden
3–5
Chapter 1. Writers and meaning making in the context of online learning
Mary R. Lea
7–26
Chapter 2. 'Wrighting' a multimodal text.
Sue Parkin
27–43
Reflection 2. Identity without identification
James Paul Gee
45–46
Chapter 3. Authoring research, plagiarising the self ?
Richard Edwards
47–59
Chapter 4. Creativity in academic writing: Escaping from the straitjacket of genre
Mary Hamilton and Kathy Pitt
61–79
Reflection 3. Overcoming barriers
Bruce Horner and Min-Zhan Lu
81–82
Part II. Pedagogy
Reflection 4. Writing pictures, painting stories with Roz Ivanič
Denny Taylor
85–87
Chapter 5. Discourses of learning and teaching: A dyslexic child learning to write
Awena Carter
89–110
Chapter 6. Accommodation for success: Korean EFL students' writing practices in personal opinion writing
Younghwa Lee
111–126
Reflection 5. Collegiality and collaboration
Karin Tusting
127–128
Chapter 7. Advanced EFL students' revision practices throughout their writing process
David Camps
129–149
Chapter 8. Reconceptualising student writing: From conformity to heteroglossic complexity.
Mary Scott and Joan Turner
151–161
Reflection 6. Roz and critical language studies at Lancaster
Norman Fairclough
163–164
Part III. Methodology
Reflection 7. Sharing writing, sharing names
Hilary Janks
167–168
Chapter 9. Bringing writers' voices to writing research: Talk around texts
Theresa Lillis
169–187
Chapter 10. Listening to children think about punctuation
Nigel Hall and Sue Sing
189–203
Reflection 8. Ivanič and the joy of writing
David Russell
205–207
Chapter 11. Recontextualising classroom experience in undergraduate writing: An exploration using case study and linguistic analysis
Zsuzsanna Walkó
209–230
Chapter 12. Researcher identity in the writing of collaborative-action research
Samina Amin Qadir
231–244
Reflection 9. An appreciation of Roz Ivanič
Brian Street
245–247
Works by Roz Ivanič referred to in this book.
249–250
Index
251–254
Why Writing Matters is an impressive appreciation of the work done by one remarkable person. It includes research from within a social practices framework on academic literacy. The editors state that the aim of the volume is to cater to both scholars and practitioners. This ambitious goal has certainly been achieved.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Lillis, Theresa, Anna Magyar & Anna Robinson‐Pant
2010. An international journal’s attempts to address inequalities in academic publishing: developing a writing for publication programme. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 40:6  pp. 781 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 22 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CJCW – Writing skills
BISAC Subject: LAN005000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Composition & Creative Writing
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2008051608