Why Translation Studies Matters

Editors
| Université Paris 3 - Sorbonne Nouvelle
| Copenhagen Business School
| University of Ljubljana
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027224347 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027288646 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
Whether Translation Studies really matters is an important and challenging question which practitioners of translation and interpreting raise repeatedly. TS scholars, many of whom are translators and interpreters themselves, are not indifferent to it either. The twenty papers of this thematic volume, contributed by authors from various parts of Europe, from Brazil and from Israel, address it in a positive spirit. Some do so through direct critical reflection and analysis, arguing in particular that the engagement of TS with society should be strengthened so that the latter could benefit more from the former. Others illustrate the relevance and contribution of TS to society and to other disciplines from various angles. Topics broached include the cultural mediation role of translators, issues in literary translation, knowledge as intellectual capital, globalization through English and risks associated with it, bridging languages, mass media, corpora, training, the use of modern technology, interdisciplinarity with psycholinguistics and neurophysiology.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 88]  2010.  xi, 269 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
ix–xiv
Part 1. Does TS matter?
Why interpreting studies matters
Franz Pöchhacker
3–14
What matters to Translation Studies?: On the role of public Translation Studies
Kaisa Koskinen
15–26
Part 2. Translation and society
Translators as cultural mediators: Wish or reality? A question for Translation Studies
David Limon
29–40
Censorship in the translations and pseudo-translations of the West
Marie del Carmen Camus-Camus
41–56
A world without God: Slovene Bambi
Nike K. Pokorn
57–68
Manipulating the matricial norms: A comparison of the English, Swedish and French translations of La caverna de las ideas by José Carlos Somoza
Yvonne Lindqvist
69–82
Knowledge in Translation Studies and translation practice: Intellectual capital in modern society
Hanna Risku, Angela Dickinson and Richard Pircher
83–94
Part 3. Language issues
Is Translation Studies going Anglo-Saxon?: Critical comments on the globalization of a discipline
Mary Snell-Hornby
97–104
Slowakisch: Brückensprache zur slawischen Welt?: Möglichkeiten und Grenzen einer kleinen EU-Sprache
Martina Vankúšová
105–114
Translation Studies and mass media research
Rachel Weissbrod
115–124
Register shifts in translations of popular fiction from English into Slovene
Marija Zlatnar Moe
125–136
Getting the ACCENT right in Translation Studies
Ian A. Williams
137–152
Die Kirche im Dorf oder die Regierung im Wald lassen: Zum Übersetzungsproblem der Namen von Ämtern und Ähnlichem für Nachrichtenzwecke im Medium Radio
Dieter H. Schmitz
153–164
Part 4. Assessment and training
Magnifying glasses modifying maps: A role for translation theory in introductory courses
Heloísa Pezza Cintrão
165–182
Effects of short intensive practice on interpreter trainees’ performance
Magdalena Bartłomiejczyk
183–194
Corpora in translator training: A program for an eLearning course
Kerstin Kunz, Sara Castagnoli and Natalie Kübler
195–208
Part 5. Psychology
Psycholinguistik, Übersetzungswissenschaft und Expertiseforschung im Rahmen der interdisziplinären Forschung
Caroline Lehr
211–222
Interpreting Studies and psycholinguistics: A possible synergy effect
Agnieszka Chmiel
223–236
fMRI for exploring simultaneous interpreting
Barbara Ahrens, Eliza Kalderon, Christoph M. Krick and Wolfgang Reith
237–248
Part 6. Postscript
Why Translation Studies matters: A pragmatist’s viewpoint
Daniel Gile
251–262
Name index
263
Concept index
267
Cited by

Cited by other publications

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2017.  In Crowdsourcing and Online Collaborative Translations [Benjamins Translation Library, 131], Crossref logo
Agost, Rosa & Pilar Ordóñez López
2015. Translation theory: Myths, prejudices and realities. Babel 61:3  pp. 361 ff. Crossref logo
Flynn, Peter, Joep Leerssen & Luc van Doorslaer
2016.  In Interconnecting Translation Studies and Imagology [Benjamins Translation Library, 119],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Gile, Daniel
2012.  In Handbook of Translation Studies [Handbook of Translation Studies, 3],  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
Nour, Struys & Stengers
2019. Attention Network in Interpreters: The Role of Training and Experience. Behavioral Sciences 9:4  pp. 43 ff. Crossref logo
Ordóñez-López, Pilar & Rosa Agost
2015.  In Handbook of Research on Teaching Methods in Language Translation and Interpretation [Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design, ],  pp. 324 ff. Crossref logo
Salmi, Leena & Tuija Kinnunen
2015. Training translators for accreditation in Finland. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 9:2  pp. 229 ff. Crossref logo
Snell-Hornby, Mary
2012. From the Fall of the Wall to Facebook. Translation Studies in Europe twenty years later. Perspectives 20:3  pp. 365 ff. Crossref logo
Sun, Sanjun
2014. Rethinking translation studies. Translation Spaces 3  pp. 167 ff. Crossref logo
Tyulenev, Sergey
2014. Translation as a social fact. Translation and Interpreting Studies 9:2  pp. 179 ff. Crossref logo
van Doorslaer, Luc
2013.  In Handbook of Translation Studies [Handbook of Translation Studies, 4],  pp. 77 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2009039870