Relevance Theory, Figuration, and Continuity in Pragmatics

Editor
| University of Warsaw
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205544 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261199 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
The chapters in this volume apply the methodology of relevance theory to develop accounts of various pragmatic phenomena which can be associated with the broadly conceived notion of style. Some of them are devoted to central cases of figurative language (metaphor, metonymy, puns, irony) while others deal with issues not readily associated with figurativeness (from multimodal communicative stimuli through strong and weak implicatures to discourse functions of connectives, particles and participles). Other chapters shed light on the use of specific communicative styles, ranging from hate speech to humour and humorous irony.

Using the relevance-theoretic toolkit to analyse a spectrum of style-related issues, this volume makes a case for the model of pragmatics founded upon inference and continuity, understood as the non-existence of sharply delineated boundaries between classes of communicative phenomena.
[Figurative Thought and Language, 8]  2020.  vii, 357 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii
Introduction: The literal-figurative language continuum and optimally relevant interpretations
Agnieszka Piskorska
1–22
Part 1. Continua in non-literalness
23–65
Chapter 1. Category extension as a variety of loose use
Ewa Wałaszewska
25–43
Chapter 2. Metonymic relations – from determinacy to indeterminacy
Maria Jodlowiec and Agnieszka Piskorska
45–65
Part 2. Concepts, procedures and discourse effects
67–164
Chapter 3. Evidential participles and epistemic vigilance
Manuel Padilla Cruz
69–94
Chapter 4. The Greek connective gar: Different genres, different effects?
Sarah Casson
95–119
Chapter 5. Metarepresentation markers in Indus Kohistani: A study with special reference to the marker of desirable utterances loo
Beate Lubberger
121–164
Part 3. Multimodality and style
165–226
Chapter 6. When EVERYTHING STANDS OUT, Nothing Does: Typography, expectations and procedures
Kate Scott and Rebecca Jackson
167–192
Chapter 7. Relevance, style and multimodality: Typographical features as stylistic devices
Ryoko Sasamoto and Minako O'Hagan
193–226
Part 4. Pragmatic effects and emotions
227–287
Chapter 8. Towards a relevance-theoretic account of hate speech
Jadwiga Linde-Usiekniewicz
229–257
Chapter 9. Tropes of ill repute: Puns and (often thwarted) expectations of relevance
Agnieszka Solska
259–287
Part 5. Stylistic effects in literary works
289–350
Chapter 10. Another look at “Cat in the rain”: A cognitive pragmatic approach to text analysis
Seiji Uchida
291–308
Chapter 11. Echoic irony in Philip Larkin’s poetry and its preservation in Polish translations
Agnieszka Walczak
309–326
Chapter 12. Humour and irony in George Mikes’ How to be a Brit
Maria Angeles Ruiz-Moneva
327–350
Name index
351–354
Subject index
355–357
“This original and entertaining series of essays uses the framework of relevance theory to offer striking new insights into the workings of figurative language and style. Why do puns have such a bad reputation? What is the meaning of “sunbeds are the new cigarettes”? How does choice of typography affect understanding? These and many more questions are illustrated with original examples from everyday conversation and literary texts, and illuminated from a variety of theoretical perspectives.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020006062