Language in Interaction

Studies in honor of Eve V. Clark

Editors
| Hebrew University, Jerusalem
| Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen
| University of Rochester
| University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027244017 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269256 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Understanding how communicative goals impact and drive the learning process has been a long-standing issue in the field of language acquisition. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the social and pragmatic aspects of language learning: the way interaction shapes what and how children learn. In this volume, we bring together researchers working on interaction in different domains to present a cohesive overview of ongoing interactional research. The studies address the diversity of the environments children learn in; the role of para-linguistic information; the pragmatic forces driving language learning; and the way communicative pressures impact language use and change. Using observational, empirical and computational findings, this volume highlights the effect of interpersonal communication on what children hear and what they learn. This anthology is inspired by and dedicated to Prof. Eve V. Clark – a pioneer in all matters related to language acquisition – and a major force in establishing interaction and communication as crucial aspects of language learning.
[Trends in Language Acquisition Research, 12]  2014.  xi, 358 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii–viii
List of contributors
ix–xii
introduction Language acquisition in interaction
Chigusa Kurumada and Inbal Arnon
1–10
Part 1. The social and interactional nature of language input (five papers)
Conversational input to bilingual children
Susan M. Ervin-Tripp
13–28
Social environments shape children’s language experiences, strengthening language processing and building vocabulary
Adriana Weisleder and Anne Fernald
29–50
The interactional context of language learning in Tzeltal
Penelope Brown
51–82
Conversation and language acquisition: Unique properties and effects
Edy Veneziano
83–100
Taking the floor on time: Delay and deferral in children’s turn taking
Marisa Casillas
101–114
Part 2. The role of paralinguistic information in language learning (three papers)
Temporal synchrony in early multi-modal communication
Barbara F. Kelly
117–138
Shared attention, gaze and pointing gestures in hearing and deaf children
Aliyah Morgenstern
139–156
How gesture helps children learn language
Susan Goldin-Meadow
157–172
Part 3. Pragmatic forces in language learning (six papers)
Referential pacts in child language development
Gemma Stephens and Danielle Matthews
175–190
“We call it as puppy”: Pragmatic factors in bilingual language choice
Medha Tare and Susan A. Gelman
191–206
Learning words through probabilistic inferences about speakers’ communicative intentions
Michael C. Frank
207–230
Word order as a structural cue and word reordering as an interactional process in early language acquisition
Aylin C. Küntay and Duygu Özge
231–250
The discourse basis of the Korean copula construction in acquisition
Patricia M. Clancy
251–280
Emergent clause-combining in adult-child interactional contexts
Ruth A. Berman and Lyle Lustigman
281–300
Part 4. Interactional effects on language structure 
and use (three papers)
Analytic and holistic processing 
in the development of constructions
Joan L. Bybee
303–314
From speech with others to speech for self: A case study of “externalized drama”
Dan I. Slobin
315–332
How to talk with children
Herbert H. Clark
333–352
Index
353–358
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2015.  In Trilingual Language Acquisition [Trends in Language Acquisition Research, 16], Crossref logo
Kate Scott, Billy Clark & Robyn Carston
2019.  In Relevance, Pragmatics and Interpretation, Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 24 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDC – Language acquisition
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014028444 | Marc record